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By: George W. M. Reynolds (1814-1879)

Book cover Mysteries of London vol. 1 part 1

The Mysteries of London was a best-selling novel in mid-Victorian England. The first series was published in weekly instalments from 1844-46, priced at a penny each. Serialised novels sold in this way were known as Penny Dreadfuls … without any claim to literary greatness, they sought to provide ongoing entertainment for the popular audience. This book has it all -- vice, poverty, wealth, virtue, in every combination. Consider it a Victorian soap opera.Summary by Cori Samuel. Note: this project only covers half of volume 1. To be continued!

Book cover Mysteries of London vol. 1 part 2

The Mysteries of London was a best-selling novel in mid-Victorian England. The first series was published in weekly instalments from 1844-46, priced at a penny each. Serialised novels sold in this way were known as Penny Dreadfuls … without any claim to literary greatness, they sought to provide ongoing entertainment for the popular audience. When first published, this book was intended for an adult audience. The crime and vice involved would have had a terrible effect on the Young Mind of the Victorian Era. However, it’s less likely to cause offence or concern now, though I don’t recommend it for younger children.

By: George W. Ogden (1871-1966)

Book cover Trail's End

When an agriculture professor wanders into a wicked Kansas cowtown in order to experiment raising wheat, both the professor and the town get more than they bargain for. A wild and wooly Western.

By: Georgia Wood Pangborn (1872-1958)

Book cover Interventions

A collection of short stories of social commentary, tales of love, mystery, and loss. Many of the stories revolve around children, women, and relationships with friends of varying classes, often in odd, unusual, or difficult circumstances in life. (Introduction by Psudonae Vox)

By: Gerald Birney Smith (1868-1929)

Book cover Guide to the Study of the Christian Religion

Articles by numerous authors, compiled into a single collection for use by first year divinity students. This book is intended to be a guide to the study of the Christian religion for Protestants. It was prepared to aid students to understand various aspects of education for the Christian ministry, including basic textual studies, theology, Christian history, denominations, Christian ethics and pastoral duties.

By: Geraldine Bonner (1870-1930)

Book cover Girl at Central

Molly Morganthau, day operator in the telephone exchange, helps to solve a murder.

By: Grant M. Overton (1887-1930)

Book cover Women Who Make Our Novels

”This book, the rather unpremeditated production of several months’ work, is by a man who is not a novelist and who is therefore entirely unfitted to write about women who are novelists.” The author is a literary reporter and from that perspective he offers a short biographical sketch “of all the living American women novelists whose writing, by the customary standards, is artistically fine . . . [or] whose writing has attained a wide popularity.” This book was published in 1918.

By: Gregory of Nyssa (c 335 - c 395)

Book cover The Life of Saint Macrina

The poignant biography of Saint Macrina, by her brother, Saint Gregory of Nyssa. (The Reader)“The use of the word "philosophy" to designate Christianity is common in the writings of the fourth century, ... It is employed in a twofold sense, of the Christian religion generally and of asceticism in particular.” (from the 2nd footnote of the narrated text.)

Book cover Funeral Oration on Meletius

Saint Meletius was Patriarch of Antioch from 360 until his death in 381. One of his last acts was to preside over the First Council of Constantinople, held in 381. Saint Gregory of Nyssa, renown as one of the Cappadocian Fathers, was in attendance, and gave the eulogy at the latter's funeral. However, the text repeatedly alludes to an event of joy in contrast to the repose of Meletius. This refers to the very recent installation of Gregory Nazianzen as Archbishop of Constantinople.

By: Guy Morton (1884-1948)

Book cover Rangy Pete

Canadian novelist Guy Morton's Rangy Pete is one of a trio of westerns he wrote in the 1920s (the other two being Black Gold and Wards of the Azure Hills). In this one, the Gary Cooper-esque title character, Rangy Pete, goes up against the Dervishers, and outlaw clan that's been stirring up trouble for the peaceable folks of Triple Butte. In so doing, he encounters a beautiful blue-eyed girl-bandit who promptly throws a lasso around his heart. As the action heats up, the grandeur of magnificent western landscape does battle with the picturesqueness of Rangy's colorful cowboy argot, and the reader comes out the winner...

By: Guy Wetmore Carryl (1873-1904)

Book cover How a Fisherman Corked up His Foe in a Jar

LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of How a Fisherman Corked up His Foe in a Jar by Guy Wetmore Carryl. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project fo September 22, 2013.Guy Wetmore Carryl was an American humorist and poet. Some of his better known poems were parodies on nursery rhymes and Aesop's Fables. (

Book cover Fables for the Frivolous (Version 2)

Fables for the Frivolous is one of the earliest works by the American parodist Guy Wetmore Carryl. These fables are adapted from Jean de La Fontaine's original writings. The Aesop-style fables are written in verse, and are light-hearted re-tellings of fables from two centuries before, each ending with a moral and a pun. Among the more celebrated of the fables are The Persevering Tortoise and the Pretentious Hare, The Arrogant Frog and the Superior Bull, and The Sycophantic Fox and the Gullible Raven. ( from Wikipedia)

By: Hafiz (1325-1390)

Book cover Poems from the Divan of Hafiz

Hafiz was a Persian poet. His collected works (Divan) are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature. While influenced by Islam, his mystical works are highly regarded by Hindus, Christians and others, and his influence extends to several well-known writers such as Thoreau, Goethe, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. This modest collection of 43 poems is translated by Gertrude Bell.

By: Hallam Hawksworth (1863-?)

Book cover Adventures of a Grain of Dust

This charming book for children is full of interesting facts about all sorts of plants, insects, birds and animals and how they all help to enrich the soil for farmers - each in its own special way. Join our narrator, The Grain of Dust on a fascinating journey around the planet to meet them. "I don't want you to think that I'm boasting, but I do believe I'm one of the greatest travellers that ever was; and if anybody, living or dead, has ever gone through with more than I have I'd like to hear about it...

By: Hallie Erminie Rives (1874-1956)

Tales From Dickens by  Hallie Erminie Rives Tales From Dickens

The Old Curiosity Shop; Hard Times; A Tale of Two Cities; Oliver Twist; The Pickwick Papers. Have you read any or all of these famous Dickens stories? The author of this marvelous book, Rives Ermine, a highly successful author in her own right, simply wanted to retell the basic elements of some of Dickens best beloved novels and story lines. Now is your chance to revisit these stories and revive the memories of great reads. Of it you haven't gotten around to some of these classics, this would be a marvelous chance to listen to what they are about so you can enjoy them even more in the original later...

By: Hannah Webster Foster (1758-1840)

Book cover Coquette, Or The History of Eliza Wharton

The classic early American epistolary novel about the seduction and ruin of a passionate young woman. Based on the true story of Elizabeth Whitman, whose lonesome death in childbirth in a Connecticut inn sparked widespread discussion and outrage, the novel went through many editions and innumerable printings in the century after its initial publication in 1797.

By: Harriet Lummis Smith

Peggy Raymond's Vacation (or Friendly Terrace Transplanted) by  Harriet Lummis Smith Peggy Raymond's Vacation (or Friendly Terrace Transplanted)

Sequel to The Girls of Friendly Terrace (or Peggy Raymond's Success). As the summer opens the girls fan themselves on the porch, wishing for a get away. As it happens, opportunity knocks, leading them into a country vacation along with a few more members to the party.

Book cover Girls of Friendly Terrace (or Peggy Raymond's Success)

Peggy Raymond and her friends, Amy, Priscilla and Ruth, encounter a new neighbour, Elaine, and her family. While Peggy, in her usual cheerful and practical manner, welcomes them into the neighbourhood of Friendly Terrace, a variety of mysteries slowly unfold about them and why they ended up moving there. (Harriet Lummis Smith later went on to write four sequels to Eleanor H. Porter's "Pollyanna" books.)

Book cover Peggy Raymond's School Days (or Old Girls And New)

Published in 1916, this third installment with The Friendly Terrace girls places them in The Girl’s High School, with an array of new characters, and a few peripherally known from the first book. A heavier edge of drama comes through via a new student with a superiority complex, another student whose diligent scholastic achievements mar her socially, and an odd tradition of affectionate favouritism between Freshman and Seniors which proves to be awkward and disruptive to more than just the students. Peggy, Amy, Priscilla and Ruth are again faced with new challenges, and complicated scenarios to help resolve.

Book cover Friendly Terrace Quartette (or Peggy Raymond At The Poplars)

The Friendly Terrace Quartette (or Peggy Raymond At The Poplars) published in 1920, finds Peggy and her friends preparing for The Great War. Young men they had known as boys are signing up to train and fight as soldiers, while the girls find themselves looking for what they can do to help. Priscilla, and Amy join Peggy in The Land Army to assist in agricultural labour usually left to men of the period. Ruth, of weaker health, must remain on Friendly Terrace but manages to find her own way to be useful...

Book cover Peggy Raymond's Way (or Blossom Time At Friendly Terrace)

In this fifth and (as far as is known) final volume of Peggy Raymond and her Friendly Terrace entourage, we find the Girls winding down from the Great War, and pursuing more domestic and mischievous pursuits. Finishing up college and preparing for Peggy and Grahame's wedding, Ruth, Amy and Priscilla look toward their own opportunities of future relationships and potential marriages. As Harriet Lummis Smith is so good at, it is a neat blend of continuity toward the known characters and charming introductions of the new.

By: Harry A. Lewis

Book cover Hidden Treasures

"Some succeed while others fail. This is a recognized fact; yet history tells us that seven-tenths of our most successful men began life poor." A selection of mini-biographies teaches us how some successful men have overcome odds to make their mark on history.

By: Henry A. Sherman (1870-?)

Book cover Children's Bible

This is a Book of Children's Bible Stories.

By: Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924)

Book cover Theodore Roosevelt; An Address Delivered Before The Congress Of The United States

A biographical encomium delivered on the occasion of Roosevelt's death. Theodore "T.R." Roosevelt, Jr. (1858 – 1919) was an American author, naturalist, explorer, historian, and politician who served as the 26th President of the United States. He was a leader of the Republican Party (the "GOP") and founder of the Progressive Party. He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity...

By: Henry George (1839-1897)

Book cover Progress and Poverty

What I have done in this book, if I have correctly solved the great problem I have sought to investigate, is, to unite the truth perceived by the school of Smith and Ricardo to the truth perceived by the schools of Proudhon and Lasalle; to show that laissez faire (in its full true meaning) opens the way to a realization of the noble dreams of socialism; to identify social law with moral law, and to disprove ideas which in the minds of many cloud grand and elevating perceptions.

By: Henry Handel Richardson (1870-1946)

Book cover Getting of Wisdom (Version 2)

Henry Handel Richardson was the pseudonym of Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson, a writer who was born in 1870 to a reasonably well-off family which later fell on hard times. The author's family lived in various Victorian towns and from the age of 13 to 17 Richardson attended boarding school at the Presbyterian Ladies' College in Melbourne, Victoria. It's this experience that feeds directly into The Getting of Wisdom. Laura Tweedle Rambotham, the main character, is the eldest child of a country family...

By: Henry Stanton

Book cover Sex: Avoided Subjects Discussed in Plain English (version 2)

Henry Stanton was appalled at the shocking lack of information given to young people about sex and reproduction in his time. He felt this was a crime that needed to be fixed and so he wrote this book explaining sex for young and old. Ignorance of basic reproductive processes he felt led to experimentation that then led to sin, crime and prostitution. While this book is definitely not written in what I would call Plain English, contains some very questionable 'facts' about masturbation and menstruation and might seem very moralistic and dogmatic to our current society, he does hold out high ideas for all in affairs of self respect, love and marriage...

By: Hesiod

Book cover Works and Days, The Theogony, and The Shield of Heracles

Works and Days provides advice on agrarian matters and personal conduct. The Theogony explains the ancestry of the gods. The Shield of Heracles is the adventure of Heracles accepting an enemy's challenge to fight.

By: Homer (c. 8th cen - c. 8th cen)

Book cover Homeric Hymns, Epigrams, and The Battle of Frogs and Mice

Homeric Hymns are thirty-three poems each paying homage to a certain Greek god. Only a few of the poems are more than 250 lines while the rest are about a dozen lines each. They are written in Homeric style and traditionally attributed to Homer but their true provenance is unknown. The Epigrams are a series of fragments on disparate topics including sailors, children and potters and are similarly attributed to Homer although it appears Hesiod and others wrote some of them. Finally, Battle of Frogs and Mice is a light-weight parody -- literally, at one-fiftieth the number of lines -- of Homer's famous battle of Greeks and Trojans epic, Illiad.

Book cover Odysseys of Homer

The Odysseys are a collection of stories about Ulysses' journey home from the war at Troy purportedly written in the 8th century BCE by Homer, a blind poet thought to have lived in the Greek colonies in Asia Minor, possibly at Smyrna. The events described are thought to have occurred centuries before being recorded by Homer, handed down orally since the twelfth century BCE, the golden era of the Greek Bronze Age when the world was populated by heroic mortals and often visited by the Gods. This verse...

Book cover Iliad (Pope Translation)

Homer’s Iliad is the first great work of Western literature. Composed in twenty-four books of Greek hexameter poetry, it portrays the events of the last year of the Trojan War. Its translation into rhyming couplets by Alexander Pope is considered by some the greatest act of translation in English. Its power sweeps the reader along through an epic tale that begins with the wrath of Achilles and ends with the burial of Hector, breaker of horses. (Introduction by Steve Perkins)

Book cover Iliad of Homer, Rendered into English Blank Verse

"It must equally be considered a splendid performance; and for the present we have no hesitation in saying that it is by far the best representation of Homer's Iliad in the English language." - London Times, 1865"The merits of Lord Derby's translation may be summed up in one word, it is eminently attractive; it is instinct with life; it may be read with fervent interest; it is immeasurably nearer than Pope to the text of the original. Lord Derby has given a version far more closely allied to the original, and superior to any that has yet been attempted in the blank verse of our language." - Edinburgh Review, January 1865.


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