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By: Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis (-2nd Cent.)

Book cover Satires

Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis, known in English as Juvenal, was a Roman poet active in the late 1st and early 2nd century AD. The details of the author's life are unclear, although references within his text to known persons of the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD fix his terminus post quem (earliest date of composition). The Satires are a collection of satirical poems by Juvenal written in the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD. Juvenal is credited with sixteen known poems divided among five books; all are in the Roman genre of satire, which, at its most basic in the time of the author, comprised a wide-ranging discussion of society and social mores in dactylic hexameter...

By: Delmer Eugene Croft

Supreme Personality by Delmer Eugene Croft Supreme Personality

Life is self-realization. Every birth is divine. We are born anew every morning. My wish is that you may catch the gleam, be freed from limitations and enter upon your boundless possibilities. To bring you into the throne-room of your being, that you may awaken in self-realization, is why I have prepared this course of lessons. Should you give five minutes a day to them, in a year you will know the joy there is in Life, in Power, and in Service. (from the text)

By: Denis Diderot (1713-1784)

Rameau's Nephew by Denis Diderot Rameau's Nephew

Rameau's Nephew, or the Second Satire (French: Le Neveu de Rameau ou La Satire seconde) is an imaginary philosophical conversation written by Denis Diderot, probably between 1761 and 1772. It was first published in 1805 in German translation by Goethe, but the French manuscript used has subsequently disappeared. The German version was translated back into French by de Saur and Saint-Genies and published in 1821. The first published version based on French manuscript appeared in 1823 in the Brière edition of Diderot's works...

By: Desiderius Erasmus (1466/69-1536)

The Praise of Folly by Desiderius Erasmus The Praise of Folly

The Praise of Folly (Greek title: Morias Enkomion (Μωρίας Εγκώμιον), Latin: Stultitiae Laus, sometimes translated as In Praise of Folly, Dutch title: Lof der Zotheid) is a satirical essay written in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466/69-1536). It is considered one of the most influential works of literature in Western civilization and one of the catalysts of the Protestant Reformation.It starts off with a satirical learned encomium after the manner of the Greek satirist...

By: DeWitt C. Peters

Book cover Life and Adventures of Kit Carson

Kit Carson was a famous hunter, trapper, mountain man, guide - an American icon. Stories about him abounded in popular contemporary literature, but most was pure fiction. This work is the authorized biography, much of it in his own words. It was first published right around the time of his death.

By: Dhan Gopal Mukerji (1890-1936)

Book cover Kari the Elephant

The adventures of an Indian boy and his beloved elephant. Born near Calcutta, Mukerji won the Newbury Medal for children's fiction.

Book cover Kari the Elephant (Version 2)

Kari the Elephant is a 1922 work by Dhan Gopal Mukerji. The book is the first among those written in English by an Indian author in the category of children's literature. Kari the Elephant is a bildungsroman narrative that unravels the relationship shared by the protagonist boy and Kari the elephant and the adventures the boy, along with Kari and Kope, the pet monkey go through living by the edge of the forest is quite mesmerizing. Their relationship grows stronger with each adventure and their lives defy the boundaries between human and animal society...

By: Dillon Wallace (1863-1939)

The Lure of the Labrador Wild by Dillon Wallace The Lure of the Labrador Wild

The Lure Of The Labrador Wild is a account of a expedition by Leonidas Hubbard, an adventurer and journalist to canoe the system Naskaupi River - Lake Michikamau in Labrador and George River in Quebec. His companions on this journey were his friend, New York lawyer Dillon Wallace and an Indian guide from Missannabie, George Elson. From the start, the expedition was beset with mistakes and problems. Instead of ascending the Naskaupi River, by mistake they followed the shallow Susan Brook. After hard long portaging and almost reaching Lake Michikamau, with food supplies running out, on September 15 at Windbound lake, they decided to turn back...

By: Dinah Craik (1826-1887)

John Halifax, Gentleman by Dinah Craik John Halifax, Gentleman

This novel, published in 1856, was one of the popular and beloved novels in the Victorian era. It is told in the first person by Phineas Fletcher, an invalid son of a Quaker tanner who is presented to us in the beginning as a lonely youth. John Halifax, the first friend he ever had, is a poor orphan who is taken in by his father to help in the work which his sickly son can't constantly do. Phineas tells us in an unforgettable way how John succeeded in rising from his humble beginning and become a wealthy and successful man. But with the money come horrible troubles... In an unforgettable manner, we learn to know all the characters of the novel as if they really lived.

By: Dinah Maria Craik (1826-1887)

Olive by Dinah Maria Craik Olive

Inspired by Jane Eyre, Dinah Maria Craik's 1850 novel, Olive, was one of the first to feature a disabled central character. 'Slightly deformed' from birth, Olive believes that she will never be able to marry like other women, so she devotes her life to her art, her mother, and above all, her religion. It takes a dark secret from the past and a new, fascinating acquaintance, to make her realize what her life could be.

By: Dinah Maria Mulock Craik (1826-1887)

Book cover Fairy Book

The sleeping beauty in the wood -- Hop-O'-My-Thumb -- Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper -- Adventures of John Dietrich -- Beauty and the Beast -- Little One Eye, Little Two Eyes, and Little Three Eyes -- Jack the giant-killer -- Tom Thumb -- Rumpelstilzchen -- Fortunatus -- The Bremen Town Musicians -- Riquet with the tuft -- House Island -- Snow-White and Rose-Red -- Jack and the bean-stalk -- Graciosa and Percinet -- The iron stove -- The invisible prince -- The woodcutter's daughter --...

Book cover October

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of October by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik. This was the Weekly Poetry project for October 6, 2019. ------ Dinah Maria Craik was an English novelist and poet. She is best remembered for her novel John Halifax, Gentleman, which presents the ideals of English middle-class life. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Diogenes Laertius (-3rd Cent.)

Book cover Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, Book VI

There are 10 divisions in this title. This project is a recording of book 6. There is a number of interesting anecdotes on the lives of Antisthenes, Diogenes of Sinope, Monimus, Onesicritus, Crates of Thebes, Metrocles, Hipparchia, Menippus and Menedemus. Their school of thought is known an Cynicism. Most of the text in this book is devoted to the anecdotes concerning Diogenes's life and sayings. Even Alexander envied his life saying that if he had not been Alexander, he should have liked to be Diogenes.

By: Dion Boucicault (1820-1890)

Book cover London Assurance

This fast-paced Victorian farce is at heart a comedy of manners. Dion Bouciault’s witty dialogue ridicules the pretensions of society as the plot sets up the unpleasant initial situation of the aging, vain Sir Harcourt Courtly being set by a special provision of her father’s will to marry 18-year-old Grace Harkaway. The situation quickly escalates upon their arrival at Oak Hall to seal the engagement as more increasingly zany minor characters are added and romantic complications ensue. Double courtship and comic deception abound in this high-spirited comedy...

By: Dion Clayton Calthrop (1878-1937)

English Costume by Dion Clayton Calthrop English Costume

The world, if we choose to see it so, is a complicated picture of people dressing and undressing. The history of the world is composed of the chat of a little band of tailors seated cross-legged on their boards; they gossip across the centuries, feeling, as they should, very busy and important. As you will see, I have devoted myself entirely to civil costume—that is, the clothes a man or a woman would wear from choice, and not by reason of an appointment to some ecclesiastical post, or to a military calling, or to the Bar, or the Bench. Such clothes are but symbols of their trades and professions, and have been dealt with by persons who specialize in those professions.

By: Dolf Wyllarde

The Pathway of the Pioneer by Dolf Wyllarde The Pathway of the Pioneer

The story of seven girls who have banded themselves together for mutual help and cheer under the name of “Nous Autres.” They represent, collectively, the professions open to women of no deliberate training, though well educated. They are introduced to the reader at one of their weekly gatherings and then the author proceeds to depict the home and business life of each one individually. (From the 1909 back-of-book advertisement)

By: Dolly

Book cover The Vampire Nemesis and Other Weird Tales of the China Coast

This unjustly forgotten classic collection of grisly horror stories from pseudonymous author Dolly brings us four tantalizing and terrible tales of hate-fueled murder, foul deeds, fierce creatures and other terrors that lurk in the dark. A vicious lout is given his just desserts at the claws of the titular creature in "The Vampire Nemesis". A spurned hypnotist exacts an evil revenge on the man who took his lost love from him in "Death Grips". "Cerberus" details the truly shocking and disturbing acts of a scarred and vicious cat as told by the ravings of a madman...

By: Dolores McKenna

Book cover Adventures of Squirrel Fluffytail

"Once upon a time, on a beautiful island that stood at the center of a great big lake, there lived in the heart of a kindly old oak tree a dear little squirrel family. There were three in all; father, mother and fluffytail and they were just the happiest family one could imagine." So begins the tale of little Fluffytail and her many adventures. A fun little story. - Summary by Phil Chenevert

By: Dom Bede Camm (1864-1942)

Book cover Voyage of the Pax

An amazing allegorical story about the journey to Heaven, using the image of a journey across the water in a ship named The Pax. St. Benedict's Rule helps to keep the travelers faithful to their goal. They encounter storms, monsters, and enticing islands along the way... if you were in the ship, would you stay the course through all the temptations?

By: Donald Alexander Mackenzie (1873-1936)

Book cover Myths and Legends: Myths of Babylonia and Assyria

Donald Alexander Mackenzie was a Scottish journalist and prolific writer on religion, mythology and anthropology in the early 20th century. His works included Indian Myth and Legend, Celtic Folklore and Myths of China and Japan.As well as writing books, articles and poems, he often gave lectures, and also broadcast talks on Celtic mythology.This volume deals with the myths and legends of Babylonia and Assyria, and as these reflect the civilization in which they developed, a historical narrative has been provided, beginning with the early Sumerian Age and concluding with the periods of the Persian and Grecian Empires...

Elves and Heroes by Donald Alexander Mackenzie Elves and Heroes

This volume describes, in verse, the mythical creatures and people of ancient Scotland. It also includes explanatory notes about about the characters and folk tales that inspired the author's poetry. (Introduction by Matthew Reece)

By: Donald Evans (1884-1921)

Book cover Sonnets from the Patagonian: The Street of Little Hotels

Sonnets from The Patagonian is a collection of sonnets and the first work published by the short-lived Claire Marie press. Each sonnet is a portrait of someone Evans knows from the Modernist scene just beginning to coalesce in Greenwich Village, and each portrait is dedicated to a completely different acquaintance. What emerges is a clever, irreverent, set of early Modernist in-jokes that look forward to the Dadaist and Surrealist movements that would form in Europe after World War I. Giddy, bizarre and deftly constructed, Sonnets from the Patagonian read like nothing else of its time...

By: Donald Keyhoe (1897-1988)

Book cover Flying Saucers are Real

The Flying Saucers are Real is a book that investigates numerous encounters between USAF fighters, personnel, and other aircraft, and UFOs between 1947 and 1950. Keyhoe contended that the Air Force was actively investigating these cases of close encounter, with a policy of concealing their existence from the public until 1949. He stated that this policy was then replaced by one of cautious, progressive revelation. Keyhoe further stated that Earth had been visited by extraterrestrials for two centuries, with the frequency of these visits increasing sharply after the first atomic weapon test in 1945...

By: Donald McGibney

32 Caliber by Donald McGibney 32 Caliber

The recent interest that's being generated in the pulp fiction writers of the 1920s has lead to many of the books of that genre being resurrected and read once again. For modern-day readers, these represent what are now called “airport-lounge reads” and ideal for those few hours that you have to kill waiting in an airport or railway station, while traveling or on holiday, when you don't want anything too heavy to weigh you down! Pulp fiction, so called because the books were generally printed on cheaper paper made from recycled wood pulp, had certain characteristics...

By: Donald Ogden Stewart

Perfect Behavior by Donald Ogden Stewart Perfect Behavior

A humorous guide to manners and etiquette for ladies and gentlemen in a social "crises," published in 1922. (Introduction by Samanem)

Book cover Perfect Behavior (Version 2)

A humorous guide for ladies and gentlemen in all social crises.

By: Donald Shaw

Book cover Eighteen Months' Imprisonment

This is an absorbing memoir of an inmate's experiences and impressions while in a London prison. He describes himself as "a man of education and worldly experience" and weighing "19 stone 13 lbs" (279 lbs), a stone being 14 lbs, at the beginning of his imprisonment but not upon his release. The author writes with a reporter's keen perception and a talented novelist's ability to engage and at times amuse the reader.

By: Donald Wandrei (1908-1987)

Book cover Raiders of the Universes

It was the 34th century and all five of the Federation of Planets around Sol were buzzing with their usual activity when the Raiders appeared. They were indeed Raiders of Universes because they had ravaged many systems before reaching Earth and showed no signs of slowing down in the least. Their weapons were invincible, their greed merciless and their natures completely alien. Indeed 'they' were from another dimension entirely. Eating up entire solar systems and planets, they slowed down just a bit when intelligent life was found on Earth...

By: Donald Wollheim (1914-1990)

The Secret Of The Ninth Planet by Donald Wollheim The Secret Of The Ninth Planet

An alien race has put a station on Earth and other planets in order to steal the rays of the sun, possible causing the sun to nova within two years. Burl Denning, a high school student, is the only person who has the power to stop the alien project. Can he and the crew of the experimental space ship Magellan act in time to save the earth?

Book cover Secret of the Ninth Planet (Version 2)

An alien race has put a station on Earth and other planets in order to steal the rays of the sun, possible causing the sun to nova within two years. Burl Denning, a high school student, is the only person who has the power to stop the alien project. Can he and the crew of the experimental space ship Magellan act in time to save the earth?

By: Doris Stevens (1892-1963)

Jailed for Freedom by Doris Stevens Jailed for Freedom

A first-hand account of the 1913-1919 campaign of American suffragists, detailing their treatment at the hands of the courts, and the true conditions of their incarceration.

By: Dorothy C. Paine

A Little Florida Lady by Dorothy C. Paine A Little Florida Lady

This is the story of a little girl from New York who moves with her family to Florida in the late 19th Century. Parental warning: as this book was first published in 1903 and set in the American South, and although the author tries to be open-minded, please be aware that there are slang words used for African Americans.


Page 85 of 163   
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