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By: Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

Book cover Mother Nature (Dickinson)

LibriVox volunteers bring you 8 recordings of Mother Nature by Emily Dickinson. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for June 3, 2013While Emily Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation...

Book cover Hope

Read in English by Ann Simmons; CaprishaPage; David Lawrence; Joe Brenneman; Jason Mills; venom3071; Jannie Meisberger; Julia Niedermaier; John Sercel; Jacob Paul Starr; Lee Ann Howlett; Larry Greene; Maryanka; Maria Kasper; ravenotation; Savannah

Book cover There's a certain slant of light

In tribute to the first real snowfall this year.

Book cover Thunder-Storm

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of A Thunder-Storm by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for October 6, 2019. ------ A tribute to autumn storms. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Sleep Is Supposed To Be

volunteers bring you 26 recordings of Sleep Is Supposed To Be by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 31, 2020. ------ A description of sleep according to Emily Dickinson. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Lonely House

volunteers bring you 21 recordings of The Lonely House by Emily Dickinson. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for October 11, 2020. ------ The Lonely House seems a good prelude to Halloween. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover In Vain

volunteers bring you 16 recordings of In Vain by Emily Dickinson.. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for December 27, 2020. ------ Taken from Poems by Emily Dickinson, Series One by Emily Dickinson - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Bee

volunteers bring you 31 recordings of The Bee by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 14, 2021. ------ Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Little known during her life, she has since been regarded as one of the most important figures in American poetry. After Dickinson's death, her younger sister, Lavinia, discovered her cache of nearly 1800 poems, her work became public. - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover Troubled About Many Things

The verses of Emily Dickinson belong emphatically to what Emerson long since called "the Poetry of the Portfolio,"—something produced absolutely without the thought of publication, and solely by way of expression of the writer's own mind. A recluse by temperament and habit, literally spending years without setting her foot beyond the doorstep, and many more years during which her walks were strictly limited to her father's grounds, she habitually concealed her mind, like her person, from all but a very few friends; and it was with great difficulty that she was persuaded to print, during her lifetime, three or four poems. Yet she wrote verses in great abundance.

By: Emily Eden

The Semi-Detached House by Emily Eden The Semi-Detached House

If you're a Jane Austen fan, you'll enjoy Emily Eden's comic novels of manners, The Semi-Detached House (1859) and The Semi-Attached Couple (1860). At the opening of The Semi-Detached House, the beautiful (but rather petulant) Lady Blanche Chester, newly married and pregnant, is being installed in a suburban house while her husband is away. Her encounters with her neighbors, and the intrigues of the neighborhood, soon come to absorb and annoy her.

Book cover Semi-Attached Couple

Young and beautiful Helen Eskdale and fabulously wealthy Lord Teviot seem to be the perfect match. But when they marry, they find that misunderstandings and jealousies continually drive them apart. The machinations and intrigues of a large supporting cast surround the central question of whether their marriage will survive. Emily Eden's comedy of manners is reminiscient of Jane Austen's witty and ironic novels.

By: Emily Henrietta Hickey (1845-1924)

Book cover Sea Story

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of A Sea Story, by Emily Henrietta Hickey. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for June 27th, 2021. ------ This Irish author, narrative poet and translator is new to our catalog. In this poem, she tells a sad tale of a shipwreck and the agonizing choice of who lives and who doesn't.

By: Emily Neville (1919-1997)

It's Like This, Cat by Emily Neville It's Like This, Cat

This novel won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American children's literature in 1964. This delightful story revolves around a 14 year old boy, Dave and his adopted cat, called just "Cat", who turns his ordinary everyday life into an exciting roller-coaster ride.

Book cover It's Like This, Cat (Version 3)

The Newbery-winning novel about 14-year-old Dave Mitchell, coming of age in New York City in the 1960s. A first-person narrative of everyday life, youth, love, family squabbles, and growing up. Oh and of course, a tomcat named Cat. - Summary by Amanda Rumbaugh

By: Emily Ponsonby (1817-1877)

Book cover Violet Osborne - Trilogy

"This book is in turns funny and sad. Violet Osborne is a very beloved child with no financial problems. She is both beautiful and good, and of course she must be happy. Yet, as we learn, she is a manipulative and overbearing woman who would do anything to get her way. This book tells us about her life as a girl, and takes us through her marriage and motherhood. It is a pleasant read, as the book is so witty and charming and the descriptions are very realistic". Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Emily Post (1873-1960)

Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home by Emily Post Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home

“Many who scoff at a book of etiquette would be shocked to hear the least expression of levity touching the Ten Commandments...” Thus opens the introduction to one of the most popular American non-fiction books – one that was avidly studied by both men and women, children and adults, leaders of society and those who yearned to be part of the charmed circle! Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home by Emily Post was first published in 1922 and became an instant bestseller...

By: Emily Rose Burt

Book cover Entertaining Made Easy (Version 2)

A handy book of ideas for parties, weddings, and wedding showers. - Summary by MaybeCordelia

By: Emily Sarah Holt (1836-1893)

Book cover Lady Sybil's Choice

This historical novel is set in the 1100s in France and Jerusalem, following the First Crusade. Part of the story of Guy of Lusignan is told through the eyes of his fictional sister, Elaine. Guy travels to the Holy Land to reclaim it from the Saracens. Elaine follows afterward, finding upon arrival that her brother has fallen in love with Sybil, the sister of the leper king of Jerusalem. Queen Sybilla, a real historical character, is surrounded by political intrigue as she prepares to ascend the throne, which threatens her upcoming marriage to Guy of Lusignan...

By: Emma Dowd

Book cover Doodles, the Sunshine Boy

Doodles is a gentle child, who spends his days confined to a chair - but his life is turned round by the arrival of a special new friend, a gift from his brother Blue, with a remarkable talent. This story tells his tale and that of his life in America in the early 1900s.

By: Emma Frances Dawson (1851-1926)

Book cover Itinerant House, and Other Stories

This is a volume of short stories of supernatural fiction by American author Emma Frances Dawson. Not all of the tales depend on ghosts, most of them are much more subtle than that. The author skillfully creates undercurrents, adding a distinct quality to these stories. - Summary by Carolin

By: Emma Francis Brooke (1844-1926)

Book cover Transition

Honora Klaper is beautiful, distinguished, smart, and charming. A woman who turns heads. She is on an errand. No, it is not an errand to get a man. No, it is not an errand to make money. It is a revolutionary errand: to get an education! Not just "an education", she wants to be educated in Cambridge University. Set in a time when education of women was uncommon, and written by a lady who was educated in Cambridge herself, this book tells about the rewards and the struggles of a woman to win an education. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

Book cover Superfluous Woman

Published anonymously in 1894, “A Superfluous Woman” quickly became one of the most widely read of the “New Woman” novels that appeared at the end of the 19th century. At the opening of the story, we find Jessamine Halliday, a pampered young aristocrat, languishing and apparently close to death. Her desperate family has called in a maverick doctor, who recognizes that she suffers from the idleness and listlessness too often experienced by upper-class English women. The only “medicine” she needs is a change of thinking and new self-awareness...

By: Emma Goldman (1869-1940)

Anarchism and Other Essays by Emma Goldman Anarchism and Other Essays

Chicago, May 4, 1886. In the Haymarket region of the city, a peaceful Labor Day demonstration suddenly turns into a riot. The police intervene to maintain peace, but they soon use violence to quell the mob and a bomb is thrown, resulting in death and injuries to scores of people. In the widely publicized trial that followed, eight anarchists were condemned to death or life imprisonment, convicted of conspiracy, though none of them had actually thrown the bomb. A young Russian immigrant, Emma Goldman, had arrived just the previous year in the United States...

Book cover Deportation: Its Meaning and Menace. Last Message to the People of America

A pamphlet written by Alexander Berkman and Emma Goldman shortly before their deportation from the US in 1919.

Book cover Anarchism and Other Essays (Version 2)

Emma Goldman, the most famous anarchist in American history, shows the whole range of her iconoclastic thought in this collection of essays. Drawing from a wealth of illustrative material, including the examples of fellow anarchists and radicals of her own acquaintance, modern martyrs, dissident playwrights, poets, and authors, etc., she delineates the main themes of her philosophy with incisiveness and evangelical passion. Included among these themes are: a definition of decentralized anarchism...

By: Emma Lazarus (1849-1887)

Book cover Off Rough Point

Emma Lazarus was an American poet born in New York City. She is best known for "The New Colossus", a sonnet written in 1883; its lines appear on a bronze plaque in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty placed in 1903.

Book cover New Colossus, Version 2

My Grandma's father arrived in this country through New York City, and often spoke to my dad, when he was a boy, of what it was like to first see the Statue of Liberty. Most of my relatives arrived through Philadelphia or Boston, and didn't get to see the the "mighty woman with the torch" until later life, on vacation trips to New York City, when she was a must-see for them all. My Grandma always loved this Emma Lazarus poem, so I read this one especially for her, but also for all the other family members who came here "yearning to breathe free". And for those just like my family, who are still "♫♪coming to America, today♫♪".

By: Emma Leslie (1837-1909)

Book cover Sailor's Lass

On a dark and story night, the Coombers find a little girl. Who is she?

By: Emma Orczy (1865-1947)

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Emma Orczy The Scarlet Pimpernel

The Scarlet Pimpernel narrates the story of a rich English baronet who rescues French aristocrats facing the guillotine. He also taunted his enemies after each rescue by leaving behind a card that has a small flower on it – the scarlet pimpernel. It is a brilliant adventure story set at the time of the French Revolution. The plot is fantastic and rarely lets the readers pause for breath as it oscillates between London society and the dark night in Coastal France. The story follows a beautiful Countess who escapes from Paris as a committee there was making arrangements to send her to the guillotine...

Book cover The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel

Written by Baroness Orczy and first published in 1919, The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel is a sequel book to the classic adventure tale, The Scarlet Pimpernel. The book consists of eleven short stories about Sir Percy Blakeney’s exploits in rescuing various aristos and French citizens from the clutches of the guillotine. The stories which are listed below, are set in 1793 but appear in no particular order. They occasionally refer to events in other books in the series.

By: Emma Wolf (1865-1932)

Book cover Other Things Being Equal

Ruth Levice, the daughter of a rich San Francisco Jewish merchant, meats Dr. Herbert Kemp, and they slowly fall in love. However, she is Jewish and he is not. Can love overcome such an obstacle? And what is more important, duty or love?

By: Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928)

Book cover My Own Story

Emmeline Pankhurst was a British political activist and leader of the British suffragette movement. She was widely criticized for her militant tactics, but her work is recognised as a crucial element in achieving women's suffrage in Britain. In her autobiography, written and published just as the Great War was breaking out, Pankhurst tells of her experiences in fighting for women's rights.

By: Emmerson W. Manning

Book cover Practical Instruction for Detectives

Having been connected for many years with two of the largest and most successful private detective agencies in this country, both as an operator and as an official, and having been requested to outline briefly and concisely the most modern and up-to-date methods employed by leading detectives and private detective agencies of today, I shall confine myself in these pages to facts and a few personal experiences. I will endeavor to show that any person possessed of average intelligence, and who will use good common sense, can become a successful detective, regardless of his present or previous occupation...

By: Emory Adams Allen (1853-1933)

Book cover Golden Gems of Life

Life is full of ups and downs, joys and trials. In this work, we are advised on how to deal with what fate deals us, the good and bad, the common and uncommon. Home, childhood, success and failure, perseverance, dignity, frugality, envy, charity... all these and more are explored in this 'guide to life'. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: English Revised Version

Book cover Bible (ERV) NT 01: Matthew

The Gospel According to Matthew is one of the four canonical gospels, one of the three synoptic gospels, and the first book of the New Testament. The narrative tells how the Messiah, Jesus, rejected by Israel, finally sends the disciples to preach his Gospel to the whole world. - Summary by Glenn O'Brien

Book cover Bible (ERV) 01: Genesis

The Book of Genesis is the first book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament.Tradition credits Moses as the author of Genesis, as well as Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and most of Deuteronomy, but modern scholars increasingly see them as a product of the 6th and 5th centuries BCE. - Summary by Glenn O'Brien

Book cover Bible (ERV) NT 02: Mark

The Gospel according to Mark, also called the Gospel of Mark, or simply Mark, is the second of the four canonical gospels and of the three synoptic Gospels. It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist, his Transfiguration on a mountain, his describing of the Greatest Commandments, to his death, burial, and the discovery of his empty tomb. There is no miraculous birth or doctrine of divine pre-existence, nor, in the original ending, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus...

By: Enid Blyton (1897-1968)

Book cover Child Whispers

Enid Blyton's first published book; a short collection of poetry - Summary by Peter Why

By: Enid Yandell

Three Girls in a Flat by Enid Yandell Three Girls in a Flat

Enid Yandell (October 6, 1870 - June 13, 1934) was an American sculptor who studied with Auguste Rodin and Frederick William MacMonnies. She created numerous portraits, garden pieces and small works as well as public monuments. Ms. Yandell also studied in Paris and kept a studio there. This book, Three Girls in a Flat, is a semi-autobiographical account of her work as a sculptor for the Horticultural Building at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Co-written with two friends, it's an episodic account of the trials and tribulations of three young women eking out a living while sharing a small flat in Chicago...

By: Enos A. Mills (1870-1922)

Wild Life on the Rockies by Enos A. Mills Wild Life on the Rockies

“This book contains the record of a few of the many happy days and novel experiences which I have had in the wilds. For more than twenty years it has been my good fortune to live most of the time with nature, on the mountains of the West. I have made scores of long exploring rambles over the mountains in every season of the year, a nature-lover charmed with the birds and the trees. On my later excursions I have gone alone and without firearms. During three succeeding winters, in which I was a Government Experiment Officer and called the “State Snow Observer,” I scaled many of the higher peaks of the Rockies and made many studies on the upper slopes of these mountains.”

By: Enos Benjamin Comstock (1879-1945)

Book cover More Tuck-Me-In Stories

This charming book is full of short stories about the adventures and troubles animals find themselves in. Each tale contains an important lesson that these animals, and perhaps the children reading about them, should take to heart. - Summary by Jenn Broda

By: Epes Sargent IV (1813-1880)

Book cover Velasco

Inspired by the tale of El Cid, U.S. author Epes Sargent created this drama about a knight forced to conceal his true identity. The play debuted in 1837 at Boston’s Tremont Theatre in a production featuring visiting English actress Ellen Tree and E.L Davenport as King Ferdinand. - Summary by Kelly Taylor Cast: King Ferdinand Wayne Cooke Favillo James R. Hedrick De Lerma Alan Mapstone Velasco Jake Malizia Gonzalez Algy Pug Julio, Son of Gonzalez Andrew Latheron Hernando, his...

By: Epictetus (c.55-135)

The Enchiridion by Epictetus The Enchiridion

Epictetus (Greek: Επίκτητος; c.55–c.135) was a Greek Stoic philosopher. The name given by his parents, if one was given, is not known – the word epiktetos in Greek simply means “acquired.” Epictetus spent his youth as a slave in Rome to Epaphroditos, a very wealthy freedman of Nero. Even as a slave, Epictetus used his time productively, studying Stoic Philosophy under Musonius Rufus. He was eventually freed and lived a relatively hard life in ill health in Rome. So far as is known, Epictetus himself wrote nothing...

The Golden Sayings of Epictetus by Epictetus The Golden Sayings of Epictetus

Aphorisms from the Stoic Greek.

Book cover Discourses of Epictetus

Philosophical discourses of Epictetus as recorded by his affectionate student, Arrian. One main precept expounded is that we do not fear events but rather our thoughts about those events.

Book cover Enchiridion

The Enchiridion of Epictetus is a short collection of Stoic precepts compiled by Arrian, a student of Epictetus. Epictetus was a Greek philosopher and a champion of Stoicism, a philosophy dedicated to tranquility of the mind and soul via practical, actionable advice. Popular in the ancient and medieval world, it has even found favor in the contemporary military; fighter pilot James Stockdale attributed his survival of over seven years as a prisoner of war to the way of thinking contained in this short work.

By: Eric L. Busby

Star Trek: The Section 31 Files by Eric L. Busby Star Trek: The Section 31 Files

This collection from Darker Projects brings the Star Trek series back to life with a fictional account of our universe on the brink of war. With stakes running high a splinter group decides to take on the most morally dubious missions and bring us the listeners along for the ride. Sometimes in war there are no good options and this series explores those darker decisions that don't have to be made in everyday life. The story is action packed and goes at light speed jumping around the universe always keeping in the center of the action and outwitting the enemy.

Star Trek: Lost Frontier by Eric L. Busby Star Trek: Lost Frontier

This story begins after a long and devastating war that has left The Federation in shambles. The pressing mission for the remaining ships in Star Fleet is to travel the war-torn galaxy's and find old alleys to reunite under one federation. Many of the classic Star Trek races make an appearance in this series including the Klingons, Romulans and everyone's favorite the Borg! This book is fast paced and a very creative read. It comes recommended highly for anyone who has followed Star Trek and it also fills in a good amount of background information for those less well versed in the subject.

By: Eric Mackay (1851-1898)

Book cover Thunderstorm At Night (Version 2)

volunteers bring you 14 recordings of A Thunderstorm At Night By Eric Mackay. This was the Weekly Poetry project for June 13, 2022. ------ George Eric Mackay was an English minor poet, now remembered as the sponging half-brother of Marie Corelli, the best-selling novelist. As a poet he is described as "execrable",[5] and reliant on Corelli's promotion of his works. His first works appeared in periodicals in the early 1860s; he achieved some reputation in his time for Letters of a Violinist . It sold 35,000 copies; he repaid Corelli's efforts by implying he wrote her novels.

Book cover Thunderstorm at Night

George Eric Mackay was an English minor poet, now remembered as the sponging half-brother of Marie Corelli, the best-selling novelist. Mackay and Corelli, born Mary Mackay, were the children of Charles Mackay, by different mothers. As a poet he is described as "execrable", and reliant on Corelli's promotion of his works. Mackay achieved some reputation in his time for Letters of a Violinist . It sold 35,000 copies; he repaid Corelli's efforts by implying he wrote her novels. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Ernest Baynes (1868-1925)

Book cover Wild Bird Guests

How to entertain them; with chapters on the destruction of birds, their economic and aesthetic values, suggestions for dealing with their enemies and on the organization and management of bird clubs. - book subtitle. Note: Because of its length and complexity, Mr. Kennard's "sub-chapter" in Chapter 8 entitled "Trees, Shrubs, and Vines Attractive to Birds" has been omitted, but of course is available at the Gutenberg address for this work.

By: Ernest Belfort Bax (1854-1926)

Book cover Story of the French Revolution

Preface Excerpt: "The following sketch of the course of the French Revolution was originally published during 1889 in serial form in "Justice," the weekly organ of the Social Democratic Federation. It has been revised, corrected, and, in some parts, added to, for the present re-issue. It need scarcely be said that it in no way pretends to be a complete history of the great political, social, and intellectual movement it describes. The present volume is designed primarily as a guide to those who,...

By: Ernest Bramah (1868-1942)

Four Max Carrados Detective Stories by Ernest Bramah Four Max Carrados Detective Stories

Ernest Bramah is mainly known for his ‘Kai Lung’ books – Dorothy L Sayers often used quotes from them for her chapter headings. In his lifetime however he was equally well known for his detective stories. Since Sherlock Holmes we have had French detectives, Belgian detectives, aristocratic detectives, royal detectives, ecclesiastical detectives, drunken detectives and even a (very) few quite normal happily married detectives. Max Carrados was however probably the first blind detective.

Max Carrados by Ernest Bramah Max Carrados

Max Carrados is a blind detective who has developed his own remaining senses to a superior level and who has enlisted the superior observations skills of his butler to fill in for any deficiency of his own. His visual deficiency is no obstacle to solving the most difficult cases. As with some better known sleuths, Mr. Carrados' feats amaze, entertain and satisfy.

Book cover Wallet of Kai Lung

The Wallet of Kai Lung is a collection of fantasy stories by Ernest Bramah, all but the last of which feature Kai Lung, an itinerant story-teller of ancient China. The collection's importance in the history of fantasy literature was recognized by the anthologization of two of its tales in the celebrated Ballantine Adult Fantasy Series.

By: Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)

Book cover Three Stories & Ten Poems

The author arranged for this collection of three short stories and ten poems to be printed in a small run of 300 copies in Dijon The book entered into the public domain in 2019. - Summary by KevinS

Book cover In Our Time

This is the first edition of Hemingway's in our time, published in a very small run in France in 1924. And American edition was released the following year. There are 18 brief short stories---one might say vignettes---that demonstrate the author's early interests and his increasingly iconic literary style. - Summary by KevinS

Book cover Sun Also Rises

The Sun Also Rises was Hemingway's first novel to be published, though there is his novella The Torrents of Spring which was published earlier in the same year. The novel describes, expressed through the voice of Jake Barnes, a short period of social life that ranges from Paris to locations in Spain. One might say that the action occurs in Pamplona, Spain with the annual festival of San Fermin and its running of bulls and subsequent days of bullfights, but one can easily argue that the real interest of the novel is in its portrayal of the group to which Barnes is a part and how he details their anxieties, frailties, hopes, and frustrations.

By: Ernest Ingersoll (1852-1946)

Book cover Book of the Ocean

The Book of the Ocean is precisely what its title promises. It contains a rather broad overview of all topics connected to the ocean, such as its geography and the history of the exploration of the oceans. Besides the oceans themselves, the book contains several chapters on the different aspects of seafaring: building ships and seafaring, war ships, merchant ships and voyages, piracy, and yachting. - Summary by Carolin

By: Ernest Lawrence Thayer (1863-1940)

Book cover Casey at the Bat

LibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of Casey at the Bat by Ernst Lawrence Thayer. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for December 16, 2012. Ernst Thayer was an American writer and poet who wrote "Casey at the Bat", the "single most famous baseball poem ever written" according to the Baseball Almanac.

By: Ernest Legouve (1807-1903)

Book cover Adrienne Lecouvreur

This drama was written in 1848 for the great French tragedienne, Rachel, by Eugene Scribe and his writing partner, Ernest Legouve. Scribe is remembered for devising the compositional technique now known as the “well-made play” that dominated play-writing for most of the 19th century. This plot is loosely based on events in the life of the actress, Adrienne Lecouvreur of the Comédie-Française and the tragic outcome of her love affair with Maurice, Comte de Saxe Cast List Maurice de Saxe Andrew Latheron Prince de Bouillon Jake Malizia Abbe de Chazeuil Alan Mapstone Michonnet Adrian Stephens Poisson Greg Giordano Quinault James R...

By: Ernest Oldmeadow (1867-1949)

Book cover Susan

Susan is a perfect gem of a maid until suddenly she begins to mess things ups and is so distracted that her mistress Gertrude is determined to find out what is bothering her. After much prodding Susan confesses that she has had a marriage proposal by letter from a Lord Ruddington whom she has never met. Should she accept?? Things get a little complicated as we follow this delightful story which unfolds in diary form written by Miss Gertrude. It will make you smile and sometimes laugh out loud. Enjoy! - Summary by Celine Major

By: Ernest Poole (1880-1950)

The Harbor by Ernest Poole The Harbor

The Harbor was written in 1915 by Ernest Poole. The novel is considered by many to be one of Poole’s best efforts even though his book, The Family won a Pulitzer Prize. The Harbor is a fictional account of life on a Brooklyn waterfront through the eyes of Billy as he is growing up. The novel starts with Billy the child, living on the harbor with his father, mother, and sister, Sue. During this time he also meets Eleanor who, at that time, he considers to be strange. She later becomes an important character in the novel...

His Family by Ernest Poole His Family

The 1910s is historically considered the decade of greatest social change in history. It saw the advent and proliferation of the automobile, electricity, lighting, radio, telephone and cinema. Our present time of change is actually quite tame in comparison, though also breathless. His Family is a tale of a widowed father, working to manage this decade of change as it affects his family in New York City. His Family was the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for literature in 1919.

By: Ernest Protheroe

Book cover Noble Woman The Life-Story of Edith Cavell

Edith L. Cavell (1865–1915) was a British nurse who attended to soldiers of both sides during World War I, and helped some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium, for which she was arrested, court-martialed, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. Attempts to mount an appeal failed, and she was summarily executed within hours of the sentence by a German firing squad. Publication of the news prompted spontaneous grief and worldwide condemnation. Many memorials were created around the world, including a statue adjacent to Trafalgar Square in London...

By: Ernest Richard Suffling (1855-1911)

Book cover Land of the Broads

The Broads area of Norfolk and Suffolk is in the East Anglian region of England. It is the location of Britain's third largest inland waterway system and largest protected wetland area. Many examples of rare flora and fauna are found only in this unique location which has also been designated as a national park.This book: The Land of the Broads, is a practical guide to the extensive but (at one time), little-known district of the Broads of Norfolk and Suffolk.Written (and now narrated) for the use of all who take an interest in one of the Quaintest and most Old-World parts of England, either from an Archaeological, Historical, Picturesque, or Sporting point of view...

By: Ernest Shackleton

South! The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition 1914-1917 by Ernest Shackleton South! The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition 1914-1917

The expedition was given the grand title of The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Due to be launched in 1914, two ships were to be employed. The first, the lead vessel, fittingly named the Endurance was to transport the team to the Weddell Sea from where the great explorer Ernest Shackleton and five others would cross the icy wastes of Antarctica on foot. The second ship, the Aurora was to approach the continent from the other side and put down supplies at various points to help the explorers...

By: Ernest Shurtleff Holmes (1887-1960)

Book cover Creative Mind

This little book is an attempt to explain what each soul must discover for himself, that he stands in the midst of an eternal creative power which presses itself around his own thought, and casts back to him glorified all that he thinks. If it awakens within the consciousness of one single individual the realization that the mind of the Universal (which is the only mind that there is) is his own mind that the creative power of this mind is his also; that the manifestation of this mind is his own individuality; that the love and power and peace of this mind is within himself, it will not be written in vain...

By: Ernest Thompson Seton

The Biography of a Grizzly by Ernest Thompson Seton The Biography of a Grizzly

I first read this little book when I was in the fifth grade, and now more than fifty years later, I still find it fascinating. Ernest Thompson Seton was a man with a concern for nature her creatures and an excellent story teller. I could almost feel Wahb, the great grizzly’s pain and frustration as he tried to avoid contact with humans and just be left alone to carry out his bear business. Listening to this audio book will be an hour and a half well spent.Summary by Mike Vendetti, Narrator.

Book cover Wild Animals I Have Known

Wild Animals I Have Known is an 1898 book by naturalist and author Ernest Thompson Seton. The first entry in a new genre of realistic wild-animal fiction, Seton's first collection of short stories quickly became one of the most popular books of its day. "Lobo the King of Currumpaw", the first story in the collection, was based upon Seton's experience hunting wolves in the southwestern United States. It became a classic, setting the tone for his future works that would similarly depict animals—especially predators who were often demonized in literature—as compassionate, individualistic beings.

Book cover Biography of a Grizzly (version 2)

Wahb (meaning White Bear) is an orphaned Grizzly Bear who learns to respect his fears, fight for peace, and trust the healing powers of a stinky hot-spring. The story is aptly titled The Biography of a Grizzly because it is about the life of a Grizzly. Seton writes with a folksy tone that will enlighten children to the gore and war that Grizzly Bears endure. I thought it was fun to learn (through Wahb's story) about their life span, their diet, their ability to survive gunshots and bear-traps. Beautifully written, the author captures each moment in a way that you almost feel as though you're in the story...

By: Ernest Vincent Wright (1872-1939)

Book cover Gadsby

Fifty-year-old John Gadsby is alarmed by the decline of his hometown, Branton Hills, and rallies the city's young people to form an "Organization of Youth" to build civic spirit and improve living standards. Gadsby and his youthful army, despite some opposition, transform Branton Hills from a stagnant municipality into a bustling, thriving city. The story begins around 1906 and continues through World War I, Prohibition, and President Warren G. Harding's administration. "Gadsby" is a lipogram - a whole novel of some 50...

Book cover When Father Carves the Duck

Ernest Vincent Wright was an American author known for his book Gadsby, a 50,000-word novel which, except for the introduction and a note at the end, did not use the letter "e". The biographical details of his life are unclear. A 2002 article in the Village Voice by Ed Park said he might have been English by birth but was more probably American. The article said he might have served in the navy and that he has been incorrectly called a graduate of MIT. The article says that he attended a vocational high school attached to MIT in 1888 but there is no record that he graduated. Park said rumors that Wright died within hours of Gadsby being published are untrue. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Ernest William Hornung (1866-1921)

The Amateur Cracksman by Ernest William Hornung The Amateur Cracksman

“I’d tasted blood, and it was all over with me. Why should I work when I could steal? Why settle down to some humdrum uncongenial billet, when excitement, romance, danger and a decent living were all going begging together” – A. J. Raffles, The Ides of March.

Dead Men Tell No Tales by Ernest William Hornung Dead Men Tell No Tales

Ernest William Hornung (June 7, 1866 – March 22, 1921) was an English author. Hornung was the third son of John Peter Hornung, a Hungarian, and was born in Middlesbrough. He was educated at Uppingham during some of the later years of its great headmaster, Edward Thring. He spent most of his life in England and France, but in 1884 left for Australia and stayed for two years where he working as a tutor at Mossgiel station. Although his Australian experience had been so short, it coloured most of his literary work from A Bride from the Bush published in 1899, to Old Offenders and a few Old Scores, which appeared after his death...

Raffles, Further Adventures of the Amateur Cracksman by Ernest William Hornung Raffles, Further Adventures of the Amateur Cracksman

Raffles, Further Adventures of the Amateur Cracksman (also published as The Black Mask) is the second collection of stories in the Raffles series. After the dark turn of events at the end of The Gift of the Emperor, Bunny’s done his time and, his life not being quite what it was before, now finds himself longing for the companionship of his Raffles.

The Shadow of the Rope by Ernest William Hornung The Shadow of the Rope

Rachel Minchin stands in the dock, accused of murdering the dissolute husband she was preparing to leave. The trial is sensational, and public opinion vehemently and almost universally against her. When the jury astonishes and outrages the world with a vedict of Not Guilty, Rachel quickly finds herself in need of protection. It comes in the form of a surprising offer of marriage from a mysterious stranger who has sat through every day of her trial. The marriage to this intriguing stranger, Mr. Steel, is by mutual agreement to be a platonic one, the only condition of which is that neither is ever to question the other about the past...

A Thief in the Night by Ernest William Hornung A Thief in the Night

Gentleman thief A.J. Raffles burgles his way through a series of homes in late Victorian England. A Thief in the Night is a short story collection and Hornung's third book in the Raffles series.

Book cover Mr. Justice Raffles

A. J. Raffles is a British gentleman thief of some renown who, in this, the hero's final adventure, ironically demonstrates a sense of morality by teaching a London East End loan shark a lesson. The book was later made into a movie, as well as a British television series.

Book cover Thief in the Night - Version 2

A Thief in the Night is a 1905 collection of short stories by Ernest William Hornung, featuring his popular character A. J. Raffles. It was the third book in the series, and the final collection of short stories. In it, Raffles, a gentleman thief, commits a number of burglaries in late Victorian England. Although Raffles had been killed in the Second Boer War at the end of The Black Mask, chronicler and accomplice Bunny Manders narrates additional adventures which he had previously omitted, from various points in their criminal careers.

By: Ernst Dieffenbach (1811-1855)

Book cover Travels in New Zealand with contributions to the geography, geology, botany, and natural history of that country, Vol. I

“Let the reader imagine a deep lake of a blue colour, surrounded by verdant hills; in the lake several islets, some showing the bare rock, others covered with shrubs, while on all of them steam issued from a hundred openings between the green foliage without impairing its freshness: on the opposite side a flight of broad steps of the colour of white marble with a rosy tint, and a cascade of boiling water falling over them into the lake!” Such is Ernest Dieffenbach’s description of his first glance of the White Terraces in Lake Rotomahana, see cover image...

By: Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919)

Book cover Riddle of the Universe

The Riddle of the Universe is the philosophical work of Ernst Haeckel, eminent biologist, in which he explores the meaning of life, the nature of reality, and the connection between physiology and thought.

By: Errico Malatesta (1853-1932)

Book cover Anarchy

Anarchy explained by the anarchist Errico Malatesta.

By: Erskine Childers (1870-1922)

The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers The Riddle of the Sands

Containing many realistic details based on Childers’ own sailing trips along the German North Sea coast, the book is the retelling of a yachting expedition in the early 20th century combined with an adventurous spy story. It was one of the early invasion novels which predicted war with Germany and called for British preparedness. The plot involves the uncovering of secret German preparations for an invasion of the United Kingdom. It is often called the first modern spy novel, although others are as well, it was certainly very influential in the genre and for its time...

By: Estelle M. Hurll (1863-1924)

Child-life in Art by Estelle M. Hurll Child-life in Art

The poetry of childhood is full of attractiveness to the artist, and many and varied are the forms in which he interprets it. The Christ-child has been his highest ideal. All that human imagination could conceive of innocence and purity and divine loveliness has been shown forth in the delineation of the Babe of Bethlehem. The influence of such art has made itself felt upon all child pictures. It matters not whether the subject be a prince or a street-waif; the true artist sees in him something which is lovable and winning, and transfers it to his canvas for our lasting pleasure.

By: Esther Nelson Karn

Book cover Snowflakes

A collection of poems with varying subjects.

By: Esther Singleton (1865-1930)

Book cover Flowers of Shakespeare

A lovely collection of information about those flowers that appear in William Shakespeare's work. The brief chapters are categorized by the four seasons in which the flowers first appear. - Summary by KevinS

By: Ethel Brilliana Tweedie (1862-1940)

Book cover Behind the Footlights

In this collection of essays the author gives us an opportunity to peek into the mysterious life of the theatre; she recalls her numerous conversations with and anecdotes about the "stage folk", such as actors, actresses, playwrights, stage directors or managers. However, her portrayal of theatrical life doesn't aim at glamorising the profession and the day-to-day life of those connected with the stage. On the contrary, if there's one overarching theme to her stories it is the repeated assurance that it's a hard and precarious existence, even for those at the top of the profession, let alone those who play minor parts and are rarely mentioned.

By: Ethel C. Pedley (1859-1898)

Dot and the Kangaroo by Ethel C. Pedley Dot and the Kangaroo

Dot and the Kangaroo, written in 1899, is a children’s book by Ethel C. Pedley about a little girl named Dot who gets lost in the Australian outback and is eventually befriended by a kangaroo and several other marsupials.

By: Ethel Cook Eliot (1890-1972)

Book cover Little House in the Fairy Wood

A lonely boy is taken in by the friendly inhabitants of a little house in the woods. Through this adventure, he finds the fairy folk, nature, and happiness.

By: Ethel Dow

Book cover Diary of a Birthday Doll

A doll, given to a young girl for her birthday, goes through adventures and faults to get her new mother to love her. - Summary by Emma Hatton

By: Ethel Gwendoline Vincent (1861-1952)

Book cover Forty Thousand Miles Over Land and Water

Subtitled "The Journal of a Tour through the British Empire and America," this book is a record of the author's travels with her husband through the British Empire and America in the late 1800's. In the words of the author, "It is but a simple Journal of what we saw and did." Their travels took them across the Atlantic to the U.S. and Canada, then across the Pacific to New Zealand, Australia, then on to the Dutch East Indies, the Straits settlements, the Indian subcontinent and Egypt - Summary by knotyouraveragejo

By: Ethel Hueston (1887-1971)

Book cover Leave it to Doris

The Reverend Mr. Artman is a widower of three years and is worried he might not be able to escape the clutches of Miss Carlton, his housekeeper, much longer. Luckily, if he dismisses her from his employ, he has Doris and three other daughters to run his household.

By: Ethel J. Rosenberg (1858-1930)

Book cover A Brief Account of the Bahai Movement

“Many believe that we, in this century,” writes Ethel Rosenberg, “ are witnessing the dawn of a new spiritual epoch or era. A renewal of the Spirit is making itself felt in the Churches and in the religious and social life of all lands. This is in harmony with the teachings of the Bahais, and of their Great Leaders, now represented by Abdul Baha the ‘Servant of God,’ known to the outside world as Abbas Effendi. Once again, the Light is shining forth from that land which may indeed be called...

By: Ethel M. Dell (1881-1939)

Book cover Charles Rex

Excerpt: "Saltash was thoroughly cosmopolitan in his tastes; he liked amusement but he abhorred boredom. He was never really wicked unless he was bored. And then- que voulez vous? He did not guide the star of destiny." On his last night in Valrosa, Saltash returns to his luxurious yacht to find a stowaway, a young woman disguised as a boy. She pleads to be kept by him in order to escape from her abuser. Although ill used by life she is still very pure and Saltash falls head over heels in love with her...

Book cover Hundredth Chance

In this prequel to "Charles Rex'' by Ethel M. Dell you will meet the aristocratic blackguard Lord Saltash for whom our distressed heroine Maude Brian still holds deep feelings. Dedicated to the care of her younger crippled brother whom she adores, Maude eventually agrees to a marriage of convenience in order to escape from a home which has become unbearable after her mother marries a brutish hotel owner. Jake, an honest, strong and silent type, agrees to the marriage because he is secretly in love with her but refrains from showing it which leads to many regrettable misunderstandings...

By: Ethel Mary Brodie (1878-1931)

Book cover Rose-colored World, and Other Fantasies

Love stories make perfect short stories. This collection contains 16 different short stories on the different ways a love affair can play out. - Summary by Carolin

By: Ethel Rose Peyser (1887-1961)

Book cover Cheating the Junk-Pile — The Purchase and Maintenance of Household Equipments

This book of advice about the purchase and care of household appliances is intended to cheat the junk-pile by inspiring the buyer to get the utmost advantage out of every purchase thru wise buying and proper care of equipment after it is acquired. The book explains what the householder needs to know about the practical home use of electricity, about such modern appliances as electric washing machines and vacuum cleaners., about electric, gas, and oil stoves, heating and ventilation, kitchen furnishings, water supply, lighting, fire prevention, etc. - Summary by Book review digest, 1923

By: Ethel Sybil Turner

Seven Little Australians by Ethel Sybil Turner Seven Little Australians

This is the story of seven incorrigible children living near Sydney in the 1880’s with their military-man father, and a stepmother who is scarcely older than the oldest child of the family. A favourite amongst generations of children for over a century, this story tells of the cheeky exploits of Meg, Pip, Judy, Bunty, Nell, Baby, and The General (who is the real baby of the family), as well as providing a fascinating insight into Australian family life in a bygone era.

By: Ethel Twycross Foster (1881-1963)

Book cover Little Tales of the Desert

A six year-old girl named Mary spends Christmas vacation with her parents in the Arizona desert of 1901 or thereabouts.


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