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13 Days The Chronicle of an Escape from a German Prison   By:

13 Days The Chronicle of an Escape from a German Prison by John Alan Lyde Caunter

First Page:

Transcriber's Note: Inconsistent hyphenation in the original document has been preserved. Obvious typographical errors have been corrected. For a complete list, please see the end of this document.

[Illustration: "WITH HIS BUNDLE SAFELY ON HIS HEAD HE TOOK TO THE WATER" ( page 205 ).]

13 DAYS

THE CHRONICLE OF AN ESCAPE FROM A GERMAN PRISON

BY

CAPTAIN J.A.L. CAUNTER

1ST BN. THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT

ILLUSTRATED BY THE AUTHOR

[Illustration]

LONDON G. BELL AND SONS, LTD. 1918

CONTENTS

PAGE

INTRODUCTION vii

PART I

CHAPTER

I. CREFELD 1

II. THE MOVE TO SCHWARMSTEDT 45

III. SCHWARMSTEDT CAMP 65

PART II

IV. MY ESCAPE FROM THE CAMP 87

V. CROSSING THE FIRST TWO RIVERS 108

VI. I MEET FOX AND BLANK 125

VII. THE CROSSING OF THE WESER 134

VIII. THE RAILWAY TRACK 155

IX. CROSSING THE RIVER HUNTE, AND THE TOWN OF "DOGS" 164

X. EXIT BLANK. SHEDS 175

XI. TWO DAYS OF THE EMS 184

XII. THE CROSSING OF THE RIVER 198

XIII. ACROSS THE FRONTIER 209

XIV. CONCLUSION 222

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FACING PAGE

"With his bundle safely on his head he took to the water" Title

Fancy Portrait of "The Crab" 16

Section of a German Camp 96

"At last the two Women got up" 112

"Face to face with a Flapper on her way to bathe" 128

"Every dark corner seemed to contain a dog" 160

"Fox led them over the worst pieces of boggy ground he could find" 192

"The German Relief passed within 200 yards of my hiding place" 208

INTRODUCTION

On placing before the public this account of my escape from Germany and some episodes from my life in two prison camps, I feel that I must make clear that it was only due to the fact that I had two definite supplementary objects to attain, that I succeeded in making myself launch out in the following pages.

The first of these objects is to add my quota to the information before the public relating to the treatment and existence of those who, in prisons in Germany, have suffered and are suffering for their country.

My second object is to try to throw a little light on the marvellous spirit of the prisoners as a whole.

Think what it means to be shut up for years under such conditions.

Let me quote the prisoner poet, Lieut. Harvey, who, in Gloucestershire Friends , vividly describes what prison means in the following lines:

Laugh, oh laugh loud, all ye who long ago Adventure found in gallant company! Safe in stagnation; laugh, laugh bitterly, While on this filthiest backwater of time's flow, Drift we and rot till something set us free!

It is always a fight against this sort of thing that the prisoner of war is waging... Continue reading book >>




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