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The American Quarterly Review No. XVIII, June 1831 (Vol 9)   By:

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THE

AMERICAN

QUARTERLY REVIEW.

No. XVIII.

JUNE, 1831.

PHILADELPHIA: CAREY & LEA.

SOLD IN PHILADELPHIA BY E. L. CAREY & A. HART. NEW YORK, BY G. & C. & H. CARVILL.

LONDON : R. J. KENNETT, 59 GREAT QUEEN STREET. PARIS : A. & W. GALIGNANI, RUE VIVIENNE.

AMERICAN QUARTERLY REVIEW.

No. XVIII.

JUNE, 1831.

ART. I. COLLEGE INSTRUCTION AND DISCIPLINE.

1. Journal of the Proceedings of a Convention of Literary and Scientific Gentlemen, held in the Common Council Chamber of the City of New York . October, 1830. New York: pp. 286. 8vo.

2. Catechism of Education, Part 1st, &c . By WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE. Member of the Parliament of Upper Canada . York: 1830. pp. 46. 8vo.

3. Address of the State Convention of Teachers and Friends of Education, held at Utica . January 12th, 13th, and 14th, 1831. With an Abstract of the Proceedings of said Convention . Utica: 1831. pp. 16. 8vo.

4. Oration on the advantages to be derived from the Introduction of the Bible and of Sacred Literature as essential parts of all Education, in a literary point of view merely, from the Primary Schools to the University: delivered before the Connecticut Alpha of the Phi Beta Kappa Society . On Tuesday, September 7th, 1830. By THOMAS SMITH GRIMKE, of Charleston, S. C. New Haven: 1830. pp. 76. 8vo.

5. Lecture on Scientific Education, delivered Saturday, December 18th, 1830, before the Members of the Franklin Institute . By JAMES R. LEIB, A. M. Philadelphia: 1831. pp. 16. 8vo.

The subject of practical education has always been one of intense interest with every reflecting individual in this Union. It is a universally received axiom, that the foundation of a republic must be in the information of its people; and that whilst the monarchical governments of other countries may be successfully administered by an oligarchy of intelligence, a government like our own cannot be carried on without an extensive diffusion of knowledge amongst those who have to select its very machinery. The political circumstances of a country will also modify, most importantly, the course of instruction; and that system which is adopted in the old Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and Dublin, in a nation in which the law of primogeniture exists, where wealth is entailed in families, and where the colleges themselves are richly endowed, may be impracticable or impolitic in a country not possessing such incentives. Education must, therefore, be suited to the country; and a long period must elapse before we can expect to have individuals as well educated as in those universities, although the mass of our community may be much more enlightened. We have no benefices, no fellowships with fixed stipends, to offer for those who may devote themselves to the profound study of certain subjects. In England and Ireland, it is by no means uncommon for a student to remain at college until he is twenty two or twenty three years of age, in the acquisition of his preliminary education, or of those branches that are made to precede a professional course of study the whole period of his academic residence being consumed in the study of these departments. In this country, such a course would be as unadvisable as it is generally impracticable. The equal division of property precludes any extensive accumulation of wealth in families. The youth are compelled to launch early into life: the more useful subjects of study have to be selected, and the remainder are postponed as luxuries, to be acquired should opportunity admit of indulgence.

In no country are the colleges or higher schools so numerous, in proportion to the population, as in the United States.

In France there are three universities; in Italy, eight; in Great Britain, eight; in Germany, twenty two; and in Russia, seven: whilst in the United States, we have thirteen institutions bearing the title of universities, and thirty three that of colleges; making in all forty six higher schools capable of conferring degrees: yet a very wrong inference would be drawn, were we to affirm that the education of a nation is always in a direct ratio with the number of its higher schools... Continue reading book >>




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