Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

An Englishman's View of the Battle between the Alabama and the Kearsarge An Account of the Naval Engagement in the British Channel, on Sunday June 19th, 1864   By:

Book cover

First Page:

AN ENGLISHMAN'S VIEW OF THE BATTLE BETWEEN THE ALABAMA AND THE KEARSARGE.

AN ACCOUNT OF

THE NAVAL ENGAGEMENT IN THE BRITISH CHANNEL, ON SUNDAY, JUNE 19TH, 1864. FROM INFORMATION PERSONALLY OBTAINED IN THE TOWN OF CHERBOURG, AS WELL AS FROM THE OFFICERS AND CREW OF THE UNITED STATES' SLOOP OF WAR KEARSARGE, AND THE WOUNDED AND PRISONERS OF THE CONFEDERATE PRIVATEER.

BY FREDERICK MILNES EDGE.

NEW YORK: ANSON D. F. RANDOLPH, No. 770 BROADWAY. 1864.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1864, BY ANSON D. F. RANDOLPH, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.

EDWARD O. JENKINS, Printer and Stereotyper, 20 NORTH WILLIAM STREET.

This Record OF A MOST GLORIOUS VICTORY GAINED IN THE CAUSE OF JUSTICE AND HUMANITY, IS DEDICATED TO THAT NOBLE OFFSPRING OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE

The Sanitary Commission of the United States,

BY THEIR OBEDIENT SERVANT, THE AUTHOR.

LONDON, July 14, 1864 .

The writer of this pamphlet is an English gentleman of intelligence now residing in London, who has spent some time in this country, and is known and esteemed by many of our best citizens. He visited Cherbourg for the express purpose of making the inquiry and investigation, the results of which are embodied in the following pages, and generously devotes the pecuniary results of his copyright to the funds of the SANITARY COMMISSION.

The Alabama and the Kearsarge.

The importance of the engagement between the United States Sloop of war, Kearsarge, and the Confederate Privateer, Alabama, cannot be estimated by the size of the two vessels. The conflict off Cherbourg on Sunday, the 19th of June, was the first decisive engagement between shipping propelled by steam, and the first test of the merits of modern naval artillery. It was, moreover, a contest for superiority between the ordnance of Europe and America, whilst the result furnishes us with data wherefrom to estimate the relative advantages of rifled and smooth bore cannon at short range.

Perhaps no greater or more numerous misrepresentations were ever made in regard to an engagement than in reference to the one in question. The first news of the conflict came to us enveloped in a mass of statements, the greater part of which, not to use an unparliamentary expression, was diametrically opposed to the truth; and although several weeks have now elapsed since the Alabama followed her many defenceless victims to their watery grave, these misrepresentations obtain as much credence as ever. The victory of the Kearsarge was accounted for, and the defeat of the Alabama excused or palliated upon the following principal reasons:

1. The superior size and speed of the Kearsarge.

2. The superiority of her armament.

3. The chain plating at her sides.

4. The greater number of her crew.

5. The unpreparedness of the Alabama.

6. The assumed necessity of Captain Semmes' accepting the challenge sent him (as represented) by the commander of the Kearsarge.

Besides these misstatements there have been others put forth, either in ignorance of the real facts of the case, or with a purposed intention of diminishing the merit of the victory by casting odium upon the Federals on the score of inhumanity. In the former category must be placed the remarks of the Times (June 21st); but it is just to state that the observations in question were made on receipt of the first news, and from information furnished probably by parties unconnected with the paper, and desirous of palliating the Alabama's defeat by any means in their power. We are informed in the article above referred to that the guns of the latter vessel "had been pointed for 2,000 yards, and the second shot went right through the Kearsarge," whereas no shot whatever went through as stated... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books