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ANDREW MELVILLE

BY

WILLIAM MORISON

FAMOUS SCOTS: SERIES

PUBLISHED BY OLIPHANT ANDERSON FERRIER EDINBVRGH AND LONDON

The designs and ornaments of this volume are by Mr. Joseph Brown, and the printing from the press of Messrs. T. and A. Constable, Edinburgh.

Transcriber's notes: Minor typos have been corrected. Footnotes have been placed at the end of the paragraph to which they refer. Greek has been changed to Latin letters and placed in brackets.

PREFATORY NOTE

Let it be understood that the quotations in Scots, where the author is not mentioned, are from the Autobiography and Diary of James Melville.

March 1899.

CONTENTS

PAGE CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY 9

CHAPTER II BIRTH EDUCATION YEARS ABROAD 15

CHAPTER III SERVICES TO SCOTTISH EDUCATION PRINCIPALSHIP OF GLASGOW AND ST. ANDREWS 23

CHAPTER IV THE 'DINGING DOWN' OF THE BISHOPS MELVILLE AND MORTON 31

CHAPTER V THE 'BIGGING UP' OF THE BISHOPS UNDER LENNOX AND ARRAN MELVILLE'S FLIGHT TO ENGLAND 43

CHAPTER VI THE KING'S SURRENDER TO THE CHURCH 56

CHAPTER VII THE POPISH LORDS MELVILLE AND THE KING AT FALKLAND PALACE 71

CHAPTER VIII THE KING'S GREEK GIFT TO THE CHURCH 93

CHAPTER IX MELVILLE AT HAMPTON COURT 116

CHAPTER X THE KING'S ASSEMBLIES 134

CHAPTER XI THE TOWER: SEDAN 140

ANDREW MELVILLE

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTORY

While Andrew Melville has other claims on the lasting honour of his countrymen than the part he took in securing for Scotland the ecclesiastical system which has been the most powerful factor in her history, it may be held as certain that where this service which filled his life is disesteemed, his biography, if read at all, will be read with only a languid interest. It will be our first endeavour, therefore, to show that such a prejudice in regard to our subject is mistaken and misleading.

Melville, and all from first to last who joined in the Scottish resistance to Episcopacy, were persuaded that the controversy in which they were engaged was one not academic merely but vital, and that, as it was settled one way or the other, so would the people be left in a position in which they would be able to develop their religious life with freedom and effect, or in one which would incalculably cripple it. That is a contention which history has amply vindicated.

The best justification of the struggle carried on during the period from Melville to the Revolution (1574 1688) to preserve the Presbyterian system in the Church is to be found in the benefits which that system has conferred upon the country. It has penetrated the whole Christian people with a sense of their individual responsibility in connection with the principles and government of the Church; it has saved the Church from being dwarfed into a mere clerical corporation; it has laid for it a broad and strong basis by winning to it the attachment of its common members, and by exercising their intelligence, sympathy, and interest in regard to all its institutions and enterprises. It may be truly said of the Scottish people that their highest patriotism has been elicited and exercised over the religious problems of the nation; that they have shown more sensitiveness concerning their religious rights, liberties, and duties than concerning any other interest of their life; and that they have been more readily and deeply touched when the honour and efficiency of their Church was at stake than by any other cause whatever. How should an ecclesiastical system better vindicate its claim? Nothing so ennobles a people as the care of matters of high concern such a care as Presbyterianism has laid on the Scottish people... Continue reading book >>




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