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Aratra Pentelici, Seven Lectures on the Elements of Sculpture Given before the University of Oxford in Michaelmas Term, 1870   By: (1819-1900)

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First Page:

Library Edition

THE COMPLETE WORKS

OF

JOHN RUSKIN

CROWN OF WILD OLIVE TIME AND TIDE QUEEN OF THE AIR LECTURES ON ART AND LANDSCAPE ARATRA PENTELICI

NATIONAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION NEW YORK CHICAGO

ARATRA PENTELICI.

SEVEN LECTURES

ON THE

ELEMENTS OF SCULPTURE,

GIVEN BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD IN MICHAELMAS TERM, 1870.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

PREFACE v

LECTURE I. OF THE DIVISION OF ARTS 1

LECTURE II. IDOLATRY 20

LECTURE III. IMAGINATION 39

LECTURE IV. LIKENESS 67

LECTURE V. STRUCTURE 90

LECTURE VI. THE SCHOOL OF ATHENS 114

LECTURE VII. THE RELATION BETWEEN MICHAEL ANGELO AND TINTORET 132

LIST OF PLATES

Facing Page

I. Porch of San Zenone, Verona 14

II. The Arethusa of Syracuse 15

III. The Warning to the Kings, San Zenone, Verona 15

IV. The Nativity of Athena 46

V. Tomb of the Doges Jacopo and Lorenzo Tiepolo 49

VI. Archaic Athena of Athens and Corinth 50

VII. Archaic, Central and Declining Art of Greece 72

VIII. The Apollo of Syracuse, and the Self made Man 84

IX. Apollo Chrysocomes of Clazomenæ 85

X. Marble Masonry in the Duomo of Verona 100

XI. The First Elements of Sculpture. Incised outline and opened space 101

XII. Branch of Phillyrea 109

XIII. Greek Flat relief, and sculpture by edged incision 111

XIV. Apollo and the Python. Heracles and the Nemean Lion 119

XV. Hera of Argos. Zeus of Syracuse 120

XVI. Demeter of Messene. Hera of Cnossus 121

XVII. Athena of Thurium. Siren Ligeia of Terina 121

XVIII. Artemis of Syracuse. Hera of Lacinian Cape 122

XIX. Zeus of Messene. Ajax of Opus 124

XX. Greek and Barbarian Sculpture 127

XXI. The Beginnings of Chivalry 129

PREFACE.

1. I must pray the readers of the following Lectures to remember that the duty at present laid on me at Oxford is of an exceptionally complex character. Directly, it is to awaken the interest of my pupils in a study which they have hitherto found unattractive, and imagined to be useless; but more imperatively, it is to define the principles by which the study itself should be guided; and to vindicate their security against the doubts with which frequent discussion has lately incumbered a subject which all think themselves competent to discuss. The possibility of such vindication is, of course, implied in the original consent of the Universities to the establishment of Art Professorships. Nothing can be made an element of education of which it is impossible to determine whether it is ill done or well; and the clear assertion that there is a canon law in formative Art is, at this time, a more important function of each University than the instruction of its younger members in any branch of practical skill. It matters comparatively little whether few or many of our students learn to draw; but it matters much that all who learn should be taught with accuracy. And the number who may be justifiably advised to give any part of the time they spend at college to the study of painting or sculpture ought to depend, and finally must depend, on their being certified that painting and sculpture, no less than language, or than reasoning, have grammar and method, that they permit a recognizable distinction between scholarship and ignorance, and enforce a constant distinction between Right and Wrong... Continue reading book >>




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