Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Art of Architecture A Poem In Imitation of Horace's Art of Poetry   By:

The Art of Architecture A Poem In Imitation of Horace's Art of Poetry by Anonymous

First Page:

The Augustan Reprint Society

The Art of Architecture

A POEM

In Imitation of Horace's ART OF POETRY

(Anonymous)

(1742)

Introduction by William A. Gibson

PUBLICATION NUMBER 144 WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY University of California, Los Angeles 1970

GENERAL EDITORS

William E. Conway, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library George Robert Guffey, University of California, Los Angeles Maximillian E. Novak, University of California, Los Angeles

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

David S. Rodes, University of California, Los Angeles

ADVISORY EDITORS

Richard C. Boys, University of Michigan James L. Clifford, Columbia University Ralph Cohen, University of Virginia Vinton A. Dearing, University of California, Los Angeles Arthur Friedman, University of Chicago Louis A. Landa, Princeton University Earl Miner, University of California, Los Angeles Samuel H. Monk, University of Minnesota Everett T. Moore, University of California, Los Angeles Lawrence Clark Powell, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library James Sutherland, University College, London H. T. Swedenberg, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles Robert Vosper, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY

Edna C. Davis, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Roberta Medford, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library

INTRODUCTION

John Gwynn, generally accepted as the author of The Art of Architecture (1742), is best known to students of English literature as one of the founders of the Royal Academy and as a friend of Samuel Johnson, who undertook in 1759 to win the Blackfriars Bridge commission for Gwynn with a series of three letters in the Daily Gazeteer [1]. To architectural historians Gwynn is best known as the architect whose proposals for regularizing the street plans of London and Westminster (in London and Westminster Improved , 1766) were prophetic both of the plan which eventually emerged from the land speculation and building boom of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and of the prominence subsequently given to city planning.[2] But like Dr. Johnson, Gwynn looked as much to the past as he anticipated the future. This is almost inevitable since he too spans the years which saw the last expressions of humanist principles of art and the first struggles to find new bases for aesthetic judgments. Although the date of Gwynn's birth is unknown, he must have been almost an exact contemporary of Dr. Johnson, for he also began his literary career in the 1730's, gained public recognition in the 1750's, associated with members of the Literary Club in the 1760's, and died slightly over a year after Johnson, probably on 27 February 1786.

Their careers exhibit two more instructive parallels. Both began as amateurs, possessed of no specific training, and ended as self supporting "professionals," able to exercise their skills on demand and fully conscious of the qualifications needed for membership within their professions.[3] Second, both began with the hope of "fixing" the rules of their arts, but ended by disavowing the intention or by implicitly contradicting it. Johnson records his disillusionment with one such attempt in the "Preface" to his Dictionary (1755). Gwynn's continuing interest in the attempt is evident in his early proposals for establishing an art academy ( An Essay on Design , 1749) and in his serving as a representative of the architectural profession in the founding of the Royal Academy. However his efforts late in his career to accommodate his early principles to the needs of a nation in the midst of an economic and a building boom reveal a considerable shift from his dogmatic support of the rules of art in The Art of Architecture ... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books