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Artist and Public And Other Essays On Art Subjects   By: (1856-1919)

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First Page:

ARTIST AND PUBLIC

AND OTHER ESSAYS ON ART SUBJECTS

BY KENYON COX

[Illustration: From a photograph by Braun, Clement & Co. Plate 1. Millet. "The Goose Girl." In the collection of Mme. Saulnier, Bordeaux.]

ARTIST AND PUBLIC

AND OTHER ESSAYS ON ART SUBJECTS

BY KENYON COX

WITH THIRTY TWO ILLUSTRATIONS

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS NEW YORK MCMXIV

Copyright, 1914, by Charles Scribner's Sons Published September, 1914

TO

J.D.C.

IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF UNFAILING KINDNESS THIS BOOK IS INSCRIBED

PREFACE

In "The Classic Point of View," published three years ago, I endeavored to give a clear and definitive statement of the principles on which all my criticism of art is based. The papers here gathered together, whether earlier or later than that volume, may be considered as the more detailed application of those principles to particular artists, to whole schools and epochs, even, in one case, to the entire history of the arts. The essay on Raphael, for instance, is little else than an illustration of the chapter on "Design"; that on Millet illustrates the three chapters on "The Subject in Art," on "Design," and on "Drawing"; while "Two Ways of Painting" contrasts, in specific instances, the classic with the modern point of view.

But there is another thread connecting these essays, for all of them will be found to have some bearing, more or less direct, upon the subject of the title essay. "The Illusion of Progress" elaborates a point more slightly touched upon in "Artist and Public"; the careers of Raphael and Millet are capital instances of the happy productiveness of an artist in sympathy with his public or of the difficulties, nobly conquered in this case, of an artist without public appreciation; the greatest merit attributed to "The American School" is an abstention from the extravagances of those who would make incomprehensibility a test of greatness. Finally, the work of Saint Gaudens is a noble example of art fulfilling its social function in expressing and in elevating the ideals of its time and country.

This last essay stands, in some respects, upon a different footing from the others. It deals with the work and the character of a man I knew and loved, it was originally written almost immediately after his death, and it is therefore colored, to some extent, by personal emotion. I have revised it, rearranged it, and added to it, and I trust that this coloring may be found to warm, without falsifying, the picture.

The essay on "The Illusion of Progress" was first printed in "The Century," that on Saint Gaudens in "The Atlantic Monthly." The others originally appeared in "Scribner's Magazine."

KENYON COX.

Calder House, Croton on Hudson, June 6, 1914.

CONTENTS

ESSAY PAGE

I. ARTIST AND PUBLIC 1 II. JEAN FRANÇOIS MILLET 44 III. THE ILLUSION OF PROGRESS 77 IV. RAPHAEL 99 V. TWO WAYS OF PAINTING 134 VI. THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 149 VII. AUGUSTUS SAINT GAUDENS 169

ILLUSTRATIONS

MILLET: 1. "The Goose Girl," Saulnier Collection, Bordeaux Frontispiece FACING PAGE 2. "The Sower," Vanderbilt Collection, Metropolitan Museum, New York 46 3. "The Gleaners," The Louvre 50 4. "The Spaders" 54 5. "The Potato Planter," Shaw Collection 58 6. "The Grafter," William Rockefeller Collection 62 7. "The New Born Calf," Art Institute, Chicago 66 8. "The First Steps," 70 9. "The Shepherdess," Chauchard Collection, Louvre 72 10. "Spring," The Louvre 74

RAPHAEL: 11... Continue reading book >>




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