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Augusta Triumphans Or, the Way to Make London the Most Flourishing City in the Universe   By: (1661?-1731)

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Transcriber's note:

Every effort has been made to replicate this text as faithfully as possible, including obsolete and variant spellings and other inconsistencies. Text that has been changed to correct an obvious error is noted at the end of this e book.

The British Library shows second edition published 1729 and reprinted by D. A. Talboys, Oxford, 1841.

AUGUSTA TRIUMPHANS:

OR, THE

WAY

TO MAKE

LONDON

THE MOST FLOURISHING

CITY IN THE UNIVERSE.

FIRST,

By establishing an University where Gentlemen may have Academical Education under the Eye of their Friends.

II. By an Hospital for Foundlings.

III. By forming an Academy of Sciences at Christ's Hospital.

IV. By suppressing pretended Madhouses, where many of the Fair Sex are unjustly confined, while their Husbands keep Mistresses, &c., and many Widows are locked up for the sake of their Jointure.

V. To save our Youth from Destruction, by clearing the Streets of impudent Strumpets, suppressing Gaming Tables, and Sunday Debauches.

VI. To save our lower Class of People from utter Ruin, and render them useful, by preventing the immoderate use of Geneva: with a frank Explosion of many other common Abuses, and incontestible Rules for Amendment.

CONCLUDING WITH

An effectual Method to prevent Street Robberies .

AND

A Letter to Coll. Robinson, on account of the Orphans' Tax.

By ANDREW MORETON, Esq.

THE SECOND EDITION.

LONDON :

Printed for J. ROBERTS, in Warwick Lane , and sold by E. NUTT, at the Royal Exchange ; A. DODD, without Temple Bar ; N. BLANDFORD, at Charing Cross ; and J. STAGG, in Westminster Hall .

[ Price One Shilling. ]

AUGUSTA TRIUMPHANS:

OR, THE

WAY

TO MAKE

LONDON

THE MOST FLOURISHING

CITY IN THE UNIVERSE.

A man who has the public good in view, ought not in the least to be alarmed at the tribute of ridicule which scoffers constantly pay to projecting heads. It is the business of a writer, who means well, to go directly forward, without regard to criticism, but to offer his thoughts as they occur; and if in twenty schemes he hits but on one to the purpose, he ought to be excused failing in the nineteen for the twentieth sake. It is a kind of good action to mean well, and the intention ought to palliate the failure; but the English, of all people in the world, show least mercy to schemists, for they treat them in the vilest manner; whereas other nations give them fair play for their lives, which is the reason why we are esteemed so bad at invention.

I have but a short time to live, nor would I waste my remaining thread of life in vain, but having often lamented sundry public abuses, and many schemes having occurred to my fancy, which to me carried an air of benefit, I was resolved to commit them to paper before my departure, and leave, at least, a testimony of my good will to my fellow creatures.

But of all my reflections, none was more constantly my companion than a deep sorrow for the present decay of learning among us, and the manifest corruption of education; we have been a brave and learned people, and are insensibly dwindling into an effeminate, superficial race. Our young gentlemen are sent to the universities, it is true, but not under restraint or correction as formerly; not to study, but to drink; not for furniture for the head, but a feather for the cap, merely to say they have been at Oxford or Cambridge, as if the air of those places inspired knowledge without application. It is true we ought to have those places in reverence for the many learned men they have sent us; but why must we go so far for knowledge? Why should a young gentleman be sent raw from the nursery to live on his own hands, to be liable to a thousand temptations, and run the risk of being snapped up by sharping jilts, with which both universities abound, who make our youth of fortune their prey, and have brought misery into too many good families? Not only the hazard of their healths from debauches of both kinds, but the waste of their precious time renders the sending them so far off very hazardous... Continue reading book >>




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