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The Banished A Swabian Historical Tale. In Three Volumes.   By: (1802-1827)

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First Page:

Transcriber's Notes:

1. Page scan source: http://www.archive.org/details/banishedtrfroml00haufgoog

2. Numbering of chapters is in error starting with chapter XIII. The Chapter number XIII. is duplicated; therefore all numbers after XIII. are short by one.

3. The diphthong oe is represented by [oe].

THE BANISHED:

A

SWABIAN HISTORICAL TALE.

EDITED BY JAMES MORIER, ESQ.

AUTHOR OF HAJII BABA, &c.

IN THREE VOLUMES. VOL. I.

LONDON, HENRY COLBURN, PUBLISHER, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET. 1839.

LONDON: PRINTED BY J. B. NICHOLS AND SON, 25, PARLIAMENT STREET.

EDITOR'S NOTICE.

The Editor feels that he stands very much in the same position as the man who plies at the door of the exhibition of some historical picture or panorama, and who is ready to assure his visitors that the exhibition is quite worthy their notice, and that they will neither lose their time nor their money in inspecting it. Although, in this instance, he really has no other merit than that of being trumpeter to the show, yet he can in honesty assert, that, what he has been called upon to read he sincerely approves, and maintains that the translator of this work merits the approbation and patronage of the public for having brought to its notice, and adapted to its reading, a story full of historical interest, of graphic incidents, of good moral tendency, and true in the illustration of the national manners of Germany in the sixteenth century.

J. M.

London, March 25, 1839.

THE TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

The tale of THE BANISHED has been taken from a German work;[1] but though considerable freedom has been used in the translation from the original text; the subject matter has been closely followed. It appears from the preface of M. Hauff, the author of this work, that his aim was to give an account of an event which took place in his own country, together with a faithful description of the national manners and customs of the period of which he treats; and being written at the time when the author of Waverley was as yet only known as the "Great Unknown," it would seem that M. Hauff, impelled by the fascination of his writings, has adopted him as his model, as may be seen from the following extract from his introductory chapter: "Thanks to the happy pencil of the renowned novelist, who has painted in such lively colours the green banks of the Tweed, the Highlands of Scotland, old England's merry day, and the romantic poverty of Wales, all classes among us read his admirable works with avidity, rendered into our language in faithful translations, and realizing to our minds historical events which happened some six or seven hundred years back. Such is the effect produced by these writings, that we shall be as well, if not better, acquainted with the histories of those countries than if we had investigated them ourselves with the most learned research. The Great Unknown having opened the stores of his chronicles, and brought in review before our wondering eyes image after image, in almost endless succession has, by the power of his magic, taught us that we are likely to become better versed in the details of Scotland's history than our own; and by its means also has made us feel less intimate with the religious and secular transactions our own country in past ages, than with those of the Presbyterians and Episcopalians of Albion... Continue reading book >>




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