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Barometer and Weather Guide   By: (1805-1865)

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First Page:

BAROMETER AND WEATHER GUIDE.

BOARD OF TRADE.

1859.

COMPILED BY REAR ADMIRAL FITZROY, F.R.S.

THIRD EDITION. (WITH ADDITIONS.)

LONDON: PRINTED BY GEORGE E. EYRE AND WILLIAM SPOTTISWOODE, PRINTERS TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. FOR HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE.

AND SOLD BY J. D. POTTER, Agent for the Admiralty Charts , 31, POULTRY, AND 11, KING STREET, TOWER HILL. 1859.

Price One Shilling.

Transcriber's Note:

Minor typographical errors have been corrected without note. However, due to an omission in the original text, the anchor for footnote 4 has been placed in an assumed position.

A brief table of contents, though not present in the original publication, has been provided below:

PREFACE HOW TO FORETELL WEATHER MARINE BAROMETER ...

A contraction of rules for foretelling weather in accordance with the following pages is submitted, for scales of common barometers.

RISE FALL FOR FOR N. ELY. S. WLY. NW. N. E. SE. S. W. DRY WET OR OR LESS MORE WIND. WIND. EXCEPT EXCEPT WET FROM WET FROM N. ED. N. ED. ========================

Add one tenth for each hundred feet above the Sea.

LONG FORETOLD LONG LAST,

SHORT NOTICE SOON PAST.

FIRST RISE AFTER LOW,

FORETELLS STRONGER BLOW.

PREFACE.

Many persons have advocated placing barometers at exposed fishing villages; and the Board of Trade has sanctioned the principle of some assistance by Government to a limited extent, depending on the necessity of each case, and other contingencies, such as the care, publicity, and setting of the barometers.

It was thought advisable to substitute a few words on the scales of these instruments in place of those usually engraved (which are not the most suitable), and to compile brief and plain information respecting the use of weather glasses.

The following pages were prepared; but only the first few were intended particularly for this purpose.

After writing these, it was suggested that some remarks might be added for the benefit of many persons, especially young officers at sea, and the suggestion was complied with; yet not so as to diminish the portability of this compilation, or increase its price.

These remarks, derived from the combined observation, study, and personal experience of various individuals, are in accordance, generally, with the results obtained by eminent philosophers.

The works of Humboldt, Herschel, Dové, Sabine, Reid, Redfield, Espy, and others, are appealed to in confirmation of this statement.

To obviate any charge of undue haste, or an insufficiently considered plan which may be fairly brought against many novelties the following testimony to the first published suggestion of such a measure is submitted.

In the First Report of the Committee on Shipwrecks (1843), at pages 1, 2, 3, the following evidence was printed by order of the House of Commons.

"I think that the neglect of the use of the barometer has led to the loss of many ships. From a want of attention to the barometer, they have either closed the land (if at sea), or have put to sea (being in harbour in safety) at improper times; and in consequence of such want of precaution the ships have been lost, owing to bad weather coming on suddenly, which might have been avoided had proper attention been paid to that very simple instrument... Continue reading book >>




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