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The Bird-Woman of the Lewis and Clark Expedition   By:

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THE BIRD WOMAN OF THE LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION

A SUPPLEMENTARY READER FOR FIRST AND SECOND GRADES

BY KATHERINE CHANDLER

Author of "Habits of California Plants" and "In the Reign of Coyote: Folk Lore from the Pacific"

1905

To my friend GENEVRA SISSON SNEDDEN whose interest in this little book has encouraged its completion

PREFACE.

Because children invariably ask for "more" of the stories they find interesting, this little book of continuous narrative has been written. Every incident is found in the Lewis and Clark Journals, so that the child's frequent question, "Is it true?" can be answered in the affirmative.

The vocabulary consists of fewer than 700 words. Over half of these are found in popular primers. Therefore, the child should have no difficulty in reading this historical story after completing a first reader.

The illustrations on pages 13, 15, 29, 64, and the last one on page 79, are redrawn from Catlin's "Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Conditions of the North American Indians."

My acknowledgments are due Miss Lilian Bridgman, of San Francisco, for help in arranging the vocabulary.

KATHERINE CHANDLER.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. July 1, 1905.

CONTENTS

THE BIRD WOMAN WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE WHY SACAJAWEA WENT WEST AT FORT MANDAN THE BLACK MAN SACAJAWEA'S BABY MAKING FRIENDS WITH THE INDIANS SACAJAWEA SAVES THE CAPTAINS' GOODS SACAJAWEA'S RIVER THE FIRST SIGHT OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS SACAJAWEA IS ILL HOW THE INDIANS HUNTED BUFFALO THE FALLS OF THE MISSOURI THE CACHE NEAR THE FALLS OF THE MISSOURI HOW SACAJAWEA CURED RATTLESNAKE BITES GOING AROUND THE FALLS GRIZZLY BEARS AT THE TOP OF THE FALLS THE CLOUD BURST AT THE SOURCE OF THE MISSOURI SACAJAWEA FINDS ROOTS AND SEED SACAJAWEA'S PEOPLE SACAJAWEA'S BROTHER SACAJAWEA'S PEOPLE WILL SHOW THE WAY THE INDIANS TRY TO LEAVE THE WHITES CROSSING THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS AT THE COLUMBIA RIVER HOW THE INDIANS DRIED SALMON THE WAPPATOO TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN THE PACIFIC OCEAN SACAJAWEA ON THE OCEAN BEACH THE WHALE SACAJAWEA'S BELT AT FORT CLATSOP THE START HOME AT CAMP CHOPUNNISH OVER THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS GOING HOME EAST OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS AGAIN SACAJAWEA SAYS GOOD BYE TO THE SOLDIERS THE CENTENNIAL

[Illustration: THE STATUE OF SACAJAWEA, THE BIRD WOMAN, UNVEILED AT THE LEWIS AND CLARK CENTENNIAL, IN PORTLAND, OREGON, IN 1905]

a go hun dred Sa ca ja we a years

THE BIRD WOMAN.

The Bird Woman was an Indian. She showed the white men the way into the West. There were no roads to the West then. That was one hundred years ago. This Indian woman took the white men across streams. She took them over hills. She took them through bushes. She seemed to find her way as a bird does. The white men said, "She goes like a bird. We will call her the Bird Woman." Her Indian name was Sacajawea.

Clark A mer i can Lew is met cap tains part sol diers twen ty nine peo pie Mis sou ri Riv er

WHO THE WHITE MEN WERE.

The white men Sacajawea went with were soldiers. There were twenty nine soldiers. There were two captains. The name of one captain was Lewis. The name of the other captain was Clark. They were American soldiers.

[Illustration: CAPTAIN CLARK.] [Illustration: CAPTAIN LEWIS.]

They carried the American flag into the West. No white men knew about that part of the West then. The captains wished to learn all about the West. They wished to tell the people in the East about it. They had been going West a long time before they met Sacajawea. They had rowed up the Missouri River. They had come to many little streams. They did not know what the Indians called these streams. So they gave them new names for the white men.

camp Fourth of Ju ly Man dan cheered French man rest ed ice In de pend ence creek hus band Kan sas snow

On Fourth of July they named one stream Fourth of July Creek... Continue reading book >>




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