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The Boarding School Familiar conversations between a governess and her pupils. Written for the amusement and instruction of young ladies.   By:

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THE BOARDING SCHOOL;

OR

FAMILIAR CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN A GOVERNESS AND HER PUPILS.

WRITTEN FOR THE AMUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION OF YOUNG LADIES.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR G. AND W. B. WHITTAKER, AVE MARIA LANE. 1823.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY COX AND BAYLIS, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS.

PREFACE.

Those persons whose time is devoted to the instruction of youth, have not only abundant opportunities of ascertaining the capacities of their pupils, but of observing their various dispositions, and of noticing the effects which have been produced on them by previous habit and example. It seldom happens that amiability of temper, respectful behaviour to superiors, or kindness to inferiors, distinguish children who in their infancy have been left to the care of menials, or who have been suffered, by the blind indulgence of parents, to gratify their forward inclinations; and it as rarely occurs that those who have had the benefit of good example and parental admonition in the "bud of life," display much propensity to vice as they grow up, unless their morals become contaminated by afterwards forming improper companions. With reference to the effects of early education, it has been most truly said, that

"Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclin'd."

And though a variety of causes may operate to form the character, or give a bias to the mind, it is a fact not to be controverted, that early impressions are never wholly eradicated, and the magic of some well remembered maxim or parental caution will often come very seasonably to the aid of the most experienced.

In pourtraying the characters which are introduced in "THE BOARDING SCHOOL," the Author has endeavoured to represent, by contrast, the amiable and unamiable passions; and, by exhibiting them in their true colours, to render her fair and youthful readers as emulous to imitate the one, as they will doubtless be to avoid the other; while the narrative, being of the most familiar kind, will, it is hoped, contribute to their amusement.

THE BOARDING SCHOOL.

CHAPTER I.

Elizabeth Adair was stooping to prop a rose tree in a viranda, when she hastily turned to her sister, and exclaimed, "it is useless attending either to plants or flowers now: I must give up all my favourite pursuits."

"But you will have others to engage your attention," returned Jane.

"And will they afford me pleasure? You may as well say that I shall listen with joy to the foolish commands of some parents, and the haughty remarks of others."

"Let this be our comfort," said Jane, "sensible people always treat the instructors of youth with respect; they neither command with pride, nor complain with insolence."

"But think of the change! We, who have had every indulgence, and no cares to perplex us!"

"My dear Elizabeth, in the day of prosperity we seldom rejoice with thankfulness; but in the time of adversity, when our path is darkened, then we can bitterly repine. Surely we should place our joys and our sorrows against each other, as a defence from a murmuring spirit."

"It is not late trials that trouble me, but future vexations that I dread. You know that I have never been accustomed to stupid, drawling, spoiled children."

"I hope," said Jane, "you will not have a class of this description to instruct."

"O, all things will be easy to you, for you love children and love teaching; but I have never applied my mind to any thing of the kind: I shall not know how to ask the most simple question in nature."

Jane smiled, as she said, "Since you are so very doubtful of your abilities, I think I will give a short lesson upon teaching. Suppose you ask your pupil if she has learned grammar: if she replies in the affirmative, desire her to explain the nature of the different parts of speech. Then try her abilities in the arithmetical tables, or from the history of England; tell her to relate some particular event in the reign of one of our kings, and go on to other subjects in a similar manner... Continue reading book >>




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