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The Bobbin Boy or, How Nat Got His learning   By: (1820-1898)

Book cover

First Page:

THE

BOBBIN BOY;

OR,

HOW NAT GOT HIS LEARNING.

AN EXAMPLE FOR YOUTH.

BY

WILLIAM M. THAYER,

AUTHOR OF "THE POOR BOY AND MERCHANT PRINCE," "THE POOR GIRL AND TRUE WOMAN," "FROM POOR HOUSE TO PULPIT," "TALES FROM THE BIBLE," ETC., ETC.

BOSTON: J. E. TILTON AND COMPANY. 1862.

Entered according to Act of Congress; in the year 1860, by J. E. TILTON AND COMPANY,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

University Press, Cambridge: Printed by Welch, Bigelow, and Company.

PREFACE.

The design of this volume is to show the young how "odd moments" and small opportunities may be used in the acquisition of knowledge. The hero of the tale NAT is a living character, whose actual boyhood and youth are here delineated an unusual example of energy, industry, perseverance, application, and enthusiasm in prosecuting a life purpose.

The conclusion of the story will convince the reader, that the group of characters which surround Nat are not creations of the fancy, and that each is the bearer of one or more important lessons to the young. While some of them forcibly illustrate the consequences of idleness, disobedience, tippling, and kindred vices, in youth, others are bright examples of the manly virtues, that always command respect, and achieve success.

W. M. T.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

A GOOD BEGINNING.

The patch of squashes counting chickens before they are hatched ifs ducks, and the bright side explanation hopeful Nat Nathaniel Bowditch Sir Humphrey Davy Buxton benefit of hopefulness the squashes coming up Frank Martin "all play and no work" Ben Drake scene when Nat was four years old "thinking on his own hook" men of mark think for themselves "niggers' work" great men not ashamed of useful work the harvest day Frank's surprise Nat as a peddler his sister his drawings Samuel Budgett, Dr. Kitto, and the rich merchant peddling "creep before you can walk" the errand boy and his success what his culture of squashes shows 1 17

CHAPTER II.

UPWARD AND ONWARD.

Winter in school proposition to declaim the dialogue, "Alexander the Great and a Robber" Nat is the robber his reason sympathy for the poor and unfortunate the dialogue learned and spoken Nat's eloquence some boys who declaim poorly at first make orators at last Demosthenes Daniel Webster Nat declaiming before visitors the petition for shorter lessons Nat won't sign it Sam Drake's predicament the teacher hears of the movement his remarks about dull scholars Newton, Dr. Barrows, Adam Clarke, Chatterton, Napoleon, etc. necessity of application 17 27

CHAPTER III.

SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

The bright summer time sport at Frank's the dog "Trip" playing hy spy the boys hiding Trip finding them the result of the first game the second game the court scene talk about it with Sylvester Jones Nat goes to court the prisoners are two of his schoolmates his sympathy for them examination of witnesses the remarks of the justice Nat proposes to plead their case the sensation and result what was said of it another instance of Nat's sympathy what it foreshadowed Howard Wilberforce Buxton 28 37

CHAPTER IV.

THE WILD CHERRIES.

The excursion John's proposition decision to go the cherry tree is it wild? a discussion filling their caps surprised by the owner their escape Nat's and Frank's caps left behind the owner carries them to the house Nat's resolve to go to his house rapping at the door his explanation and confession the caps restored with a plenty of cherries the end thereof 38 47

CHAPTER V.

ATHLETIC SPORTS.

Bathing a passion for it a particular swim Nat the best swimmer swimming under water a trial a game of ball Nat the best player the result of the game remarks of spectators the fastest runner a principle to be best excelled in athletic sports through same elements of character that made him excel in school the best shoe black Reynolds made every picture best Buxton's sports in boyhood, and Sir Walter Scott's Wellington's remark Nat's remark twenty five years after Nat saving a boy from drowning his picture of the scene how he used his experience in athletic games 48 56

CHAPTER VI... Continue reading book >>




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