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Campaigning with Crook and Stories of Army Life   By: (1844-1933)

Campaigning with Crook and Stories of Army Life by Charles King

First Page:

Transcriber's Notes:

1. The original version of this book used small capitals for names in corespondence headings and closings, as well as in lists. In addition, a.m/p.m are now all in lower case. 2. Text originally in italics is now delimited by an underscore, for example: The text was italicized . 3. p. 159. To maintain margins, line 4 of the song was broken after "...you brutes," 4. In THE MYSTERY OF 'MAHBIN MILL, the original book does not contain a Chapter II. 5. Acronymns and abbreviations used in "Plodder's Promotion." Sp. Fru. abbreviates "spiritus frumenti" (better known as whiskey). C. and G. E. is the acronym for "Camp and Garrison Equipage." R.Q.M. is the acronym for Regimental Quarter Master." 6. "...account of their on..." Transcriber assumes "actions" is the missing word. The sentence broke across two pages.

[Illustration: MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE CROOK, U. S. A.]

CAMPAIGNING WITH CROOK AND STORIES OF ARMY LIFE

BY

CAPTAIN CHARLES KING, U.S.A.

AUTHOR OF "BETWEEN THE LINES" "A WAR TIME WOOING" ETC., ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

NEW YORK

HARPER & BROTHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE

1890

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1880, by

CHARLES KING,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

Copyright, 1890, by Harper & Brothers.

All rights reserved.

PREFACE.

Ten years ago, at the request of the editor of a paper at my old home, these sketches of the Sioux Campaign of 1876 were written and, finding favor with comrades to whom a few were sent, were published in pamphlet form. Now, reinforced by certain other sketches which have since appeared, they are given a new framework.

They were the first fruits, so to speak, of a pen that has since been seldom idle. They were rough sketches, to be sure, but no rougher than the campaign; and in the early days of a divorce from associations that were very dear, and of a return to surroundings once familiar, yet, after twenty years of absence, so changed that a cat in a strange garret could hardly have felt less at home, I laid their faint tribute of respect and honor at the feet of the soldier who had been our commander in the wild days in Arizona, our leader from the Platte to the Yellowstone and our comrade in every hardship and privation Brigadier General George Crook, United States Army.

Only enough of these pamphlets were printed to reach the few hundred comrades who rode the grim circuit of "The Bad Lands" in that eventful centennial year. The little edition was long ago exhausted. The years that followed only served to strengthen the ties that bound me to the revered commander of old cavalry days. Many a name recorded in these pages no longer graces our muster rolls. Mason, our soldier major, gallant Emmet Crawford, brave old Munson, daring Philo Clark Rodgers and Price, Egan and Dewees, Bache and Hunter, have been called from the ranks in which they won such honor, and, only a few short months ago, the leader whom they so faithfully served rejoined them on the farther shore of the dark and silent river. The mountains and prairies over which we marched and fought know no longer the war cry of painted savage or the din of thrilling combat. Herds of browsing cattle crowd the lovely valleys through which we drove the buffalo. Peaceful homes and smiling villages dot the broad Northwest where hardly a roof tree was in place when Crook essayed the task of subjugating the foeman to settlement and civilization. Another star had been added to the one awarded him for the campaign which left the fierce Apaches conquered and disarmed. The highest grade in the army had been attained when, all too soon, he was summoned to answer to his name, "beyond the veil."

Better pens than mine shall tell our people of his long years of brave and faithful service in which this campaign of '76 so pregnant with interest to us who rode the trail, and with result to a waiting nation was, after all, only an episode; but, just as in honor and in loyalty, these faint pictures of the stirring scenes through which he led us were inscribed to him at their birth, so now, with added honor and in affectionate remembrance tenfold increased, is that humble tribute renewed... Continue reading book >>




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