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The Coinages of the Channel Islands   By:

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THE COINAGES OF THE CHANNEL ISLANDS.

BY

LIEUTENANT COLONEL B. LOWSLEY,

ROYAL ENGINEERS (RETD.).

Author of Contributions on "The Coins and Tokens of Ceylon" ( Numismatic Chronicle, Vol. XV. ); "The XVIIth Century Tokens of Berkshire" ( Williamson's Edition of Boyne's XVIIth Century Tokens ); "Berkshire Dialect and Folk Lore, with Glossary" ( the Publication of the English Dialect Society ), &c., &c., &c.

London: VICTORIA PRINTING WORKS, 118 STANSTEAD ROAD, FOREST HILL, AND 15 KIRKDALE, SYDENHAM.

1897.

INDEX.

PAGE

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS ON COINAGES FOR THE CHANNEL ISLANDS 1

THE EARLIEST COINS OF THE CHANNEL ISLANDS 4

ROMAN COINS IN THE CHANNEL ISLANDS 7

ON EARLY IMPORTED COINS AND THEIR VALUES 9

THE COATS OF ARMS OF THE CHANNEL ISLANDS 26

THE JERSEY SILVER TOKENS OF 1813 28

COPPER AND BRONZE COINAGES OF JERSEY FROM 1841 30

ON GUERNSEY COINS FROM THE MIDDLE AGES 33

COPPER AND BRONZE COINAGES OF GUERNSEY FROM 1830 37

SILVER COUNTERMARKED GUERNSEY CROWN 38

CHANNEL ISLANDS COPPER TOKENS 39

SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 40

The Coinages of the Channel Islands.

BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL B. LOWSLEY, (Retired) Royal Engineers.

Author of Contributions on "The Coins and Tokens of Ceylon" ( Numismatic Chronicle , Vol. XV. ); "The XVIIth Century Tokens of Berkshire" (Williamson's Edition of Boyne's XVIIth Century Tokens); "Berkshire Dialect and Folk Lore, with Glossary" (the Publications of the English Dialect Society), &c., &c., &c.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS ON COINAGES FOR THE CHANNEL ISLANDS.

Before treating of the Channel Islands coinages in detail, it may be of interest briefly to notice in order the various changes and the influences which led to these.

The earliest inhabitants of the islands of whom anything is known were contemporaneous with the ancient Britons of Druidical times. Jersey and Guernsey are still rich in Druidical remains. The Table stone of the Cromlech at Gorey is 160 feet superficial, and the weight, as I have made it, after careful calculation, is about 23 3/4 tons. It rests on six upright stones, weighing, on an average, one ton each. In the very complete work recently edited by E. Toulmin Nicolle[A] is the following interesting note:

"That traces of the old Northmen, which were once obscure, have now become clear and patent; that institutions, long deemed Roman, may be Scandinavian; that in blood and language there are many more foreign elements than were originally recognized, are the results of much well applied learning and acumen. But no approximation to the proportion that these foreign elements bear to the remainder has been obtained; neither has the analysis of them gone much beyond the discovery of those which are referred to Scandinavia. Of the tribes on the mainland, those which in the time of Cæsar and in the first four centuries of our era have the best claim to be considered as the remote ancestors of the early occupants of the islanders, are the Curiosilites, the Rhedones, the Osismii, the Lemovices, the Veneti, and the Unelli all mentioned by Cæsar himself, as well as by writers who came after him. A little later appear the names of the Abrincatui and the Bajucasses. All these are referable to some part of either Normandy or Brittany, and all seem to have been populations allied to each other in habits and politics... Continue reading book >>




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