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Correspondence   By: (1850-1894)

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The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 1 Scanned and proofed by David Price ccx074@coventry.ac.uk

The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson Volume 1

CHAPTER I STUDENT DAYS AT EDINBURGH, TRAVELS AND EXCURSIONS, 1868 1873

Letter: SPRING GROVE SCHOOL, 12TH NOVEMBER 1863.

MA CHERE MAMAN, Jai recu votre lettre Aujourdhui et comme le jour prochaine est mon jour de naisance je vous ecrit ce lettre. Ma grande gatteaux est arrive il leve 12 livres et demi le prix etait 17 shillings. Sur la soiree de Monseigneur Faux il y etait quelques belles feux d'artifice. Mais les polissons entrent dans notre champ et nos feux d'artifice et handkerchiefs disappeared quickly, but we charged them out of the field. Je suis presque driven mad par une bruit terrible tous les garcons kik up comme grand un bruit qu'll est possible. I hope you will find your house at Mentone nice. I have been obliged to stop from writing by the want of a pen, but now I have one, so I will continue.

My dear papa, you told me to tell you whenever I was miserable. I do not feel well, and I wish to get home.

Do take me with you.

R. STEVENSON.

Letter: 2 SULYARDE TERRACE, TORQUAY, THURSDAY (APRIL 1866).

RESPECTED PATERNAL RELATIVE, I write to make a request of the most moderate nature. Every year I have cost you an enormous nay, elephantine sum of money for drugs and physician's fees, and the most expensive time of the twelve months was March.

But this year the biting Oriental blasts, the howling tempests, and the general ailments of the human race have been successfully braved by yours truly.

Does not this deserve remuneration?

I appeal to your charity, I appeal to your generosity, I appeal to your justice, I appeal to your accounts, I appeal, in fine, to your purse.

My sense of generosity forbids the receipt of more my sense of justice forbids the receipt of less than half a crown. Greeting from, Sir, your most affectionate and needy son,

R. STEVENSON.

Letter: TO MRS. THOMAS STEVENSON

WICK, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1868.

MY DEAR MOTHER, . . . Wick lies at the end or elbow of an open triangular bay, hemmed on either side by shores, either cliff or steep earth bank, of no great height. The grey houses of Pulteney extend along the southerly shore almost to the cape; and it is about half way down this shore no, six sevenths way down that the new breakwater extends athwart the bay.

Certainly Wick in itself possesses no beauty: bare, grey shores, grim grey houses, grim grey sea; not even the gleam of red tiles; not even the greenness of a tree. The southerly heights, when I came here, were black with people, fishers waiting on wind and night. Now all the S.Y.S. (Stornoway boats) have beaten out of the bay, and the Wick men stay indoors or wrangle on the quays with dissatisfied fish curers, knee high in brine, mud, and herring refuse. The day when the boats put out to go home to the Hebrides, the girl here told me there was 'a black wind'; and on going out, I found the epithet as justifiable as it was picturesque. A cold, BLACK southerly wind, with occasional rising showers of rain; it was a fine sight to see the boats beat out a teeth of it.

In Wick I have never heard any one greet his neighbour with the usual 'Fine day' or 'Good morning.' Both come shaking their heads, and both say, 'Breezy, breezy!' And such is the atrocious quality of the climate, that the remark is almost invariably justified by the fact.

The streets are full of the Highland fishers, lubberly, stupid, inconceivably lazy and heavy to move. You bruise against them, tumble over them, elbow them against the wall all to no purpose; they will not budge; and you are forced to leave the pavement every step.

To the south, however, is as fine a piece of coast scenery as I ever saw. Great black chasms, huge black cliffs, rugged and over hung gullies, natural arches, and deep green pools below them, almost too deep to let you see the gleam of sand among the darker weed: there are deep caves too... Continue reading book >>




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