Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Curry Cook's Assistant or, Curries, How to Make Them in England in Their Original Style   By:

Book cover

First Page:

[ Transcriber's Note: Every effort has been made to replicate this text as faithfully as possible, including inconsistencies in spelling and hyphenation; changes (corrections of spelling and punctuation) made to the original text are listed at the end of this file.

a and o with macron have been replaced with â and ô, respectively. ]

THE CURRY COOK'S ASSISTANT

NOTE ABOUT "CURRIES" IN "SATURDAY REVIEW," OCTOBER 22, 1887.

Everybody who likes Curry, and who can get it (the pamphlet, not the Curry), should invest in a little pamphlet by "DANIEL SANTIAGOE, son of Francis Daniel, butler and fiddler, of Colombo, Ceylon, and the Ceylon Court, Royal Jubilee Exhibition, Liverpool." It is written in delightful pigeon English (or whatever other bird may be more appropriate to Ceylon's isle), is quite unpretentious, avows the author's very legitimate, and, indeed, laudable desire to "make a small fortune" by its sale, and contains admirable receipts. Mr. Santiagoe is much less cynical than the apocryphal Mrs. Glasse. He says, after recommending the more excellent way of the Curry Stone, "The best and easy way is to buy from your respected grocers, which, I should say, ought to be of two colours one is brown and the other is yellow, and the red is cayenne pepper (if required, hot curries)." He is a little plaintive about mulligatawny. "Why English people always spell this word wrong? Everybody knows this mollagoo, 'pepper;' tanney, 'water.'" So the reformers who call it "mulligatunny" are just as bad as we devotees of mumpsimus and mulligatawny ourselves. We note with special pleasure a receipt for "chicken moley" evidently the same genus as that "mollet" which puzzled Mrs. Clarke. And all the prescriptions are interesting. "Maldive fish" seems to take the place of "Bombay duck" in these southern regions, and the number of Vegetable Curries is particularly noteworthy. Nobody need think from the specimens we have given that Mr. Santiagoe is unintelligible. His English may be "pigeon," but it is a much more easily digestible tongue than the high and mighty gobble gobble of some of our own professors of style and matter.

[True copy from "SATURDAY REVIEW."]

THE CURRY COOK'S ASSISTANT;

OR

CURRIES, HOW TO MAKE THEM IN ENGLAND IN THEIR ORIGINAL STYLE .

BY DANIEL SANTIAGOE, General Servant, SON OF FRANCIS DANIEL, Butler and Fiddler, Trichinopoly, Madras, India, and Colombo, Ceylon

CEYLON TEA HOUSE WAITER

Royal Jubilee Exhibition, Liverpool, 1887 International Exhibition, Glasgow, 1888

THIRD EDITION

LONDON KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH & CO., 1, PATERNOSTER SQUARE 1889

( The rights of translation and of reproduction are reserved. )

INDEX.

LIST AND NAMES OF CURRIES, Etc.

NO. PAGE

1. Home made Curry Powder 1

2. Beef Curry (Plain) 5

3. Beef Curry (Ceylon Way) 6

4. Beef Curry (Madras) 7

5. Beef Curry (Kabob) Madras 9

6. Beef Curry (Dry) do. 11

7. Beef Curry (Balls) do. 12

8. Chicken Curry do. 13

9. Snipe Curry do. 14

10... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books