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Dorothy's Tour   By: (1843-1910)

Dorothy's Tour by Evelyn Raymond

First Page:

DOROTHY'S TOUR

BY

EVELYN RAYMOND

NEW YORK HURST & CO., INC. PUBLISHERS

THE

DOROTHY BOOKS

By EVELYN RAYMOND

These stories of an American girl by an American author have made "Dorothy" a household synonym for all that is fascinating. Truth and realism are stamped on every page. The interest never flags, and is ofttimes intense. No more happy choice can be made for gift books, so sure are they to win approval and please not only the young in years, but also "grown ups" who are young in heart and spirit.

Dorothy Dorothy at Skyrie Dorothy's Schooling Dorothy's Travels Dorothy's House Party Dorothy in California Dorothy on a Ranch Dorothy's House Boat Dorothy at Oak Knowe Dorothy's Triumph Dorothy's Tour

Illustrated, 12mo, Cloth Price per Volume, 50 Cents

COPYRIGHT, 1912, BY THE PLATT & PECK CO.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER. PAGE.

I. AT BELLEVIEU 9

II. ALFARETTA'S LETTER 18

III. THE PREPARATIONS 28

IV. IN NEW YORK 40

V. THE CARNEGIE CONCERT 52

VI. THE OPERA 65

VII. AN EPISODE 82

VIII. "AMERICA" 95

IX. A DREAD CALL IN THE NIGHT 106

X. THE LOCKET 118

XI. THE TOUR BEGINS 129

XII. IN WASHINGTON 150

XIII. SIGHT SEEING 166

XIV. HIGH HONOR 187

XV. MT. VERNON 203

XVI. THE LAKE CITY 214

XVII. THE ACCIDENT 230

XVIII. CONCLUSION 245

DOROTHY'S TOUR

CHAPTER I.

AT BELLEVIEU.

"Dorothy!" called Jim as he quickly searched the garden at Bellevieu for her.

"Yes," answered Dorothy, "I am here sitting under the big oak tree."

"I have something for you," cried Jim. "Guess what?"

"Guess what?" echoed Dorothy. "Well it might be Oh! there are so many, many things it could be."

"Here, take it. Its only a letter from New York, and never mind what might be in it, read it " said Jim, who was altogether too practical and never cared to imagine or suppose anything. All he wanted was real facts and true and useful facts at that, which is not a bad trait in a youth's character.

Dorothy broke the seal carefully and read the letter through once and then started to read it all over again, exclaiming every once in a while to herself, "Oh, oh, dear. I am so glad!" and finally, "I must tell Aunt Betty at once."

Jim, who had been standing there forgotten all this time, broke in: "Oh, I say, Dolly Doodles, can you tell me what this message is that so excites you that you have clear forgotten me?"

"Oh, Jim dear," said Dorothy, "it's too wonderful. Just think, I am to start in two weeks for New York, where Mr. Ludlow will meet Aunt Betty and I."

By this time Jim and Dorothy were walking rapidly toward the house, where at once they sought Aunt Betty to tell her the news, only to find that Mrs. Calvert had gone visiting.

Seeing Old Ephraim in the hall, Dorothy ran up to him and said: "Ephraim, do tell us where Aunt Betty has gone."

"Ah certainly does know, Misses," answered old Ephraim. "She o'de'd Metty" (whom we remember as Methuselah Bonapart Washington from the previous books, Dorothy's Triumph, House Boat and Oak Knowe, and other volumes wherein our little heroine's story is told). "Metty, he 'lowed he take her see dat lil lady. De man what gibs de music lessons' wife."

"Oh, I know now, Ephy," said Dorothy, "Aunty went to see Frau Deichenberg... Continue reading book >>




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