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Down Town Brooklyn A Report to the Comptroller of the City of New York on Sites for Public Buildings and the Relocation of the Elevated Railroad Tracks now in Lower Fulton Street, Borough of Brooklyn   By:

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DOWN TOWN BROOKLYN

A Report to the Comptroller of the City of New York on Sites for Public Buildings and the Relocation of the Elevated Railroad Tracks now in Lower Fulton Street, Borough of Brooklyn

[Illustration: BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN]

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK MCMXIII

CONTENTS

LETTER FROM THE COMPTROLLER REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE First Plan Second Plan Third Plan Fourth Plan Fifth Plan Sixth Plan ADDITIONAL REPORT SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT

LETTER FROM THE COMPTROLLER

April 18th, 1913.

Dear Mr. Pratt:

It appears to me that the time has now arrived when some definite policy should be formulated regarding a number of needed improvements in the Borough of Brooklyn, with particular reference to a settlement of the court house, bridge terminal and other questions. We have had considerable discussion regarding these matters, and while this discussion has developed, as it naturally would, many divergent views, I am confident that it has also served a most useful purpose because now we all have a much better idea of the work that has to be undertaken and the importance of intelligent and united action governing it.

It is very necessary that some one should take the lead and I, therefore, suggest that you endeavor at the earliest possible time to effect a meeting of those interested as citizens and officials in developing the best plan for Brooklyn's improvement, with a view to having a definite policy proposed and so determined at this time that the only thing necessary in the future will be the authorization of the funds to carry the plan into effect.

There should be a civic center in Brooklyn. We have a nucleus of such a center in the present Borough Hall. We need a new terminal for the Brooklyn entrance of the Brooklyn Bridge, a better approach to that bridge by the present elevated railroad lines, the removal of the elevated railroad tracks from lower Fulton Street, a new court house, a new municipal building and a thorough improvement of that section running from the intersection of Myrtle Avenue and Washington Street to the terminal of the Brooklyn Bridge, using this improved section for the purpose of carrying out a general beautification of the proposed civic center.

All of these things cannot be done at once, but they are all a part of what should be a general plan. I believe that if the subject be approached in a spirit of civic patriotism a general plan can be developed which will mean the ultimate procurement of all these much needed improvements, and in such a way as to be of the greatest benefit to Brooklyn as a borough.

Yours truly,

WILLIAM A. PRENDERGAST, Comptroller

MR. FREDERIC B. PRATT Brooklyn, New York

Upon receiving the foregoing letter, Mr. Pratt conferred with a large number of officials and citizens interested in the progress of Brooklyn, and acting upon their advice formed a committee of ten, believed by him to be representative of the various points of view, for the purpose of making a systematic study of the problems set forth and to formulate a report with definite recommendations. The report and recommendations of the committee appear in the following pages.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE

OF TEN CITIZENS OF BROOKLYN APPOINTED AT THE SUGGESTION OF WILLIAM A. PRENDERGAST, COMPTROLLER OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

Since the appointment of this committee on the 30th day of April, 1913, it has had frequent meetings, conferences and hearings. Conferences have been had with representatives from organizations that have given time and study to the subjects within the scope of this committee. Several public hearings were held, notice of which was given in the public press. Written communications have been invited from all persons interested. Architects have been employed to advise and we have had the help of competent engineers.

At the outset the committee has been compelled to recognize the situation of Brooklyn and its relation to Manhattan and Greater New York... Continue reading book >>




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