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Dreams and Days: Poems   By: (1851-1898)

Book cover

First Page:

DREAMS AND DAYS

POEMS

BY

GEORGE PARSONS LATHROP

To ROSL

CONTENTS

I

STRIKE HANDS, YOUNG MEN!

"O JAY!"

THE STAR TO ITS LIGHT

"THE SUNSHINE OF THINE EYES"

JESSAMINE

THE BOBOLINK

SAILOR'S SONG, RETURNING

FIRST GLANCE

BRIDE BROOK

MAY ROSE

THE SINGING WIRE

THE HEART OF A SONG

SOUTH WIND

THE LOVER'S YEAR

NEW WORLDS

NIGHT IN NEW YORK

THE SONG SPARROW

I LOVED YOU, ONCE

II

THE BRIDE OF WAR

A RUNE OF THE RAIN

BREAKERS

BLACKMOUTH, OF COLORADO

THE CHILD YEAR

CHRISTENING

THANKSGIVING TURKEY

BEFORE THE SNOW

III

YOUTH TO THE POET

THE SWORD DHAM

"AT THE GOLDEN GATE"

CHARITY

HELEN AT THE LOOM

THE CASKET OF OPALS

LOVE THAT LIVES

IV

BLUEBIRD'S GREETING

THE VOICE OF THE VOID

"O WHOLESOME DEATH"

INCANTATION

FAMINE AND HARVEST

THE CHILD'S WISH GRANTED

THE FLOWN SOUL

SUNSET AND SHORE

THE PHOEBE BIRD

A STRONG CITY

THREE DOVES

V

ARISE, AMERICAN!

THE NAME OF WASHINGTON

GRANT'S DIRGE.

BATTLE DAYS

KEENAN'S CHARGE

MARTHY VIRGINIA'S HAND

GETTYSBURG: A BATTLE ODE

NOTES

STRIKE HANDS, YOUNG MEN!

Strike hands, young men! We know not when Death or disaster comes, Mightier than battle drums To summon us away. Death bids us say farewell To all we love, nor stay For tears; and who can tell How soon misfortune's hand May smite us where we stand, Dragging us down, aloof, Under the swift world's hoof?

Strike hands for faith, and power To gladden the passing hour; To wield the sword, or raise a song; To press the grape; or crush out wrong. And strengthen right. Give me the man of sturdy palm And vigorous brain; Hearty, companionable, sane, 'Mid all commotions calm, Yet filled with quick, enthusiastic fire; Give me the man Whose impulses aspire, And all his features seem to say, "I can!"

Strike hands, young men! 'Tis yours to help rebuild the State, And keep the Nation great. With act and speech and pen 'Tis yours to spread The morning red That ushers in a grander day: To scatter prejudice that blinds, And hail fresh thoughts in noble minds; To overthrow bland tyrannies That cheat the people, and with slow disease Change the Republic to a mockery. Your words can teach that liberty Means more than just to cry "We're free" While bending to some new found yoke. So shall each unjust bond be broke, Each toiler gain his meet reward, And life sound forth a truer chord.

Ah, if we so have striven, And mutually the grasp have given Of brotherhood, To work each other and the whole race good; What matter if the dream Come only partly true, And all the things accomplished seem Feeble and few? At least, when summer's flame burns low And on our heads the drifting snow Settles and stays, We shall rejoice that in our earlier days We boldly then Struck hands, young men!

"O JAY!"

O jay Blue jay! What are you trying to say? I remember, in the spring You pretended you could sing; But your voice is now still queerer, And as yet you've come no nearer To a song. In fact, to sum the matter, I never heard a flatter Failure than your doleful clatter. Don't you think it's wrong? It was sweet to hear your note, I'll not deny, When April set pale clouds afloat O'er the blue tides of sky, And 'mid the wind's triumphant drums You, in your white and azure coat, A herald proud, came forth to cry, "The royal summer comes!"

But now that autumn's here, And the leaves curl up in sheer Disgust, And the cold rains fringe the pine, You really must Stop that supercilious whine Or you'll be shot, by some mephitic Angry critic.

You don't fulfill your early promise: You're not the smartest Kind of artist, Any more than poor Blind Tom is. Yet somehow, still, There's meaning in your screaming bill. What are you trying to say?

Sometimes your piping is delicious, And then again it's simply vicious; Though on the whole the varying jangle Weaves round me an entrancing tangle Of memories grave or joyous: Things to weep or laugh at; Love that lived at a hint, or Days so sweet, they'd cloy us; Nights I have spent with friends; Glistening groves of winter, And the sound of vanished feet That walked by the ripening wheat; With other things... Continue reading book >>




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