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Sentimental Education, Volume II The History of a Young Man   By: (1821-1880)

Book cover

First Page:

The Complete Works of Gustave Flaubert

Embracing Romances, Travels, Comedies, Sketches and Correspondence

With a Critical Introduction by Ferdinand Brunetiere of the French Academy and a Biographical Preface by Robert Arnot, M.A.

Printed Only for Subscribers by M. Walter Dunne, New York and London

[Illustration]

[Illustration: Ah! thanks! You are going to save me!]

SENTIMENTAL EDUCATION

Or,

The History of a Young Man

by

GUSTAVE FLAUBERT

VOLUME II.

M. Walter Dunne New York and London

Copyright, 1904, by M. Walter Dunne Entered at Stationers' Hall, London

CONTENTS

SENTIMENTAL EDUCATION ( Continued. )

PAGE

CHAPTER XI. A DINNER AND A DUEL 1

CHAPTER XII. LITTLE LOUISE GROWS UP 47

CHAPTER XIII. ROSANETTE AS A LOVELY TURK 62

CHAPTER XIV. THE BARRICADE 110

CHAPTER XV. "HOW HAPPY COULD I BE WITH EITHER" 193

CHAPTER XVI. UNPLEASANT NEWS FROM ROSANETTE 214

CHAPTER XVII. A STRANGE BETROTHAL 242

CHAPTER XVIII. AN AUCTION 292

CHAPTER XIX. A BITTER SWEET REUNION 315

CHAPTER XX. "WAIT TILL YOU COME TO FORTY YEAR" 323

ILLUSTRATIONS

FACING PAGE

"AH! THANKS! YOU ARE GOING TO SAVE ME!" (See page 107) Frontispiece

"CAN I LIVE WITHOUT YOU?" 58

WHEN A WOMAN SUDDENLY CAME IN 315

SENTIMENTAL EDUCATION

[ CONTINUED ]

CHAPTER XI.

A DINNER AND A DUEL.

Frederick passed the whole of the next day in brooding over his anger and humiliation. He reproached himself for not having given a slap in the face to Cisy. As for the Maréchale, he swore not to see her again. Others as good looking could be easily found; and, as money would be required in order to possess these women, he would speculate on the Bourse with the purchase money of his farm. He would get rich; he would crush the Maréchale and everyone else with his luxury. When the evening had come, he was surprised at not having thought of Madame Arnoux.

"So much the better. What's the good of it?"

Two days after, at eight o'clock, Pellerin came to pay him a visit. He began by expressing his admiration of the furniture and talking in a wheedling tone. Then, abruptly:

"You were at the races on Sunday?"

"Yes, alas!"

Thereupon the painter decried the anatomy of English horses, and praised the horses of Gericourt and the horses of the Parthenon.

"Rosanette was with you?"

And he artfully proceeded to speak in flattering terms about her.

Frederick's freezing manner put him a little out of countenance.

He did not know how to bring about the question of her portrait. His first idea had been to do a portrait in the style of Titian. But gradually the varied colouring of his model had bewitched him; he had gone on boldly with the work, heaping up paste on paste and light on light. Rosanette, in the beginning, was enchanted. Her appointments with Delmar had interrupted the sittings, and left Pellerin all the time to get bedazzled. Then, as his admiration began to subside, he asked himself whether the picture might not be on a larger scale. He had gone to have another look at the Titians, realised how the great artist had filled in his portraits with such finish, and saw wherein his own shortcomings lay; and then he began to go over the outlines again in the most simple fashion. After that, he sought, by scraping them off, to lose there, to mingle there, all the tones of the head and those of the background; and the face had assumed consistency and the shades vigour the whole work had a look of greater firmness... Continue reading book >>




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