Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Ekkehard. Vol. I (of II) A Tale of the Tenth Century   By: (1826-1886)

Book cover

First Page:

Transcriber's Notes:

1. Page scan source: http://www.archive.org/details/ekkehardtaleofte01scheuoft

2. The diphthong oe is represented by [oe].

COLLECTION

OF

GERMAN AUTHORS.

VOL. 21.

EKKEHARD BY JOSEPH VICTOR SCHEFFEL.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

EKKEHARD.

A TALE OF THE TENTH CENTURY

BY

JOSEPH VICTOR SCHEFFEL.

Authorized Edition .

TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN

BY

SOFIE DELFFS.

IN TWO VOLUMES. VOL. I.

LEIPZIG 1872 BERNHARD TAUCHNITZ.

LONDON: SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE & RIVINGTON. CROWN BUILDINGS, 188, FLEET STREET. PARIS: C. REINWALD, 15, RUE DES SAINTS PÉRES.

TO HER DEAR FRIEND

MRS. EMILY CHAMIER

THE ENGLISH VERSION OF THIS BOOK

IS DEDICATED

BY

THE TRANSLATOR.

CONTENTS

OF VOLUME I.

Preface of the Translator

The Author's Preface

CHAPTER I. Hadwig, the Duchess of Suabia

II. The Disciples of St. Gallus

III. Wiborad the Recluse

IV. In the Monastery

V. Ekkehard's Departure

VI. Moengal

VII. Virgilius on the Hohentweil

VIII. Audifax

IX. The Woman of the Wood

X. Christmas

XI. The old Man of the Heidenhöhle

XII. The Approach of the Huns

XIII. Heribald and his Guests

XIV. The Battle with the Huns

PREFACE OF THE TRANSLATOR.

Heine, that sharp witted and unsparing critic once said that the relation of translator to author, were about the same as that of a monkey to a human being, while G[oe]the, a man of larger mind and more harmonious nature, compared the translator to a prophet, quoting a verse from the Koran which says: "God gives a prophet to every nation in its own tongue." For sixteen years the following "Tale," which since its first appearance has made and held its place, not only in the esteem, but in the hearts of the German reading public, and which has already been translated into several languages, has waited in vain for an English " prophet " to render it into that tongue, which being that most akin to the German language, is therefore, also the one best fitted for this purpose. It is true that the peculiarity of the style, which in the original is so wonderfully adapted to the matter it treats, as well as the number of old German words, might have proved a not inconsiderable difficulty for any but a German translator, and therefore, it is to be hoped, that the venturesome attempt of a German girl to render the book into English, may be excused. It need hardly be said, that with regard to expression she may often have need to appeal to the indulgence of the reader, but perhaps these defects may at least in some degree be compensated, by the strict, truthful adherence to the original, and further it should be observed that great care has been taken in choosing words of Saxon derivation whenever they were to be had. Her love for the book, and her admiration for the writer thereof, have made her spare no trouble in this undertaking, and if she could but hope to win some friends to "Ekkehard" in an English dress, she would deem herself amply repaid for the many hours spent over this work... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books