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Ethel Morton and the Christmas Ship   By: (1864-1942)

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First Page:

ETHEL MORTON

AND THE

CHRISTMAS SHIP

BY

MABELL S. C. SMITH

M. A. DONOHUE & COMPANY CHICAGO NEW YORK

Made in U. S. A.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE I THE UNITED SERVICE CLUB AT HOME 9 II DOROTHY'S COTTAGE 18 III THE CHRISTMAS SHIP 26 IV FINANCIAL PLANS 35 V ROGER GOES FORAGING 47 VI IN THE SMITH ATTIC 57 VII FOR A TRAVELLER'S KIT 70 VIII THE RED CROSS NURSE SETS SAIL 85 IX PLANNING THE U. S. C. "SHOW" 90 X THE EVENTFUL EVENING 101 XI "SISTER SUSIE'S SEWING SHIRTS FOR SOLDIERS" 115 XII JAMES CUTS CORNERS 129 XIII PASTING 139 XIV JAMES'S AFTERNOON PARTY 151 XV PREVENTION 163 XVI FOR SANTA CLAUS'S PACK 177 XVII THE CLUB WEAVES, STENCILS AND MODELS CLAY 194 XVIII ETHEL BLUE AWAITS A CABLE 206 XIX LEATHER AND BRASS 211 XX THE ETHELS COOK TO KEEP 221 XXI THE CHRISTMAS SHIP SAILS 232 XXII A WEDDING AND A SURPRISE 242

ETHEL MORTON AND THE CHRISTMAS SHIP

CHAPTER I

THE UNITED SERVICE CLUB AT HOME

"IT'S up to Roger Morton to admit that there's real, true romance in the world after all," decided Margaret Hancock as she sat on the Mortons' porch one afternoon a few days after school had opened in the September following the summer when the Mortons and Hancocks had met for the first time at Chautauqua. James and Margaret had trolleyed over to see Roger and Helen from Glen Point, about three quarters of an hour's ride from Rosemont where the Mortons lived.

"Roger's ready to admit it," confessed that young man. "When you have an aunt drop right down on your door mat, so to speak, after your family has been hunting her for twenty years, and when you find that you've been knowing her daughter, your own cousin, pretty well for two months it does make the regular go to school life that you and I used to lead look quite prosy."

"How did she happen to lose touch so completely with her family?"

"I told you how Grandfather Morton, her father, opposed her marrying Uncle Leonard Smith because he was a musician. Well, she did marry him, and when they got into straits she was too proud to tell her father about it."

"I suppose Grandfather would have said, 'I told you so,'" suggested Helen.

"And I believe it takes more courage than it's worth to face a person who's given to saying that," concluded James.

"Aunt Louise evidently thought it wasn't worth while or else she didn't have the courage and so she drifted away. Her mother was dead and she had no sisters and Father and Uncle Richard probably didn't write very often."

"She thought nobody at home loved her, I suppose," said Helen. "Father and Uncle Richard did love her tremendously, but they were just young fellows at the time and they didn't realize what their not writing meant to her."

"Once in a while they heard of Uncle Leonard through the music papers," went on Roger, "but after his health failed, Aunt Louise told us the other day, he couldn't make concert appearances and of course a man merely playing in an orchestra isn't big enough to command public attention."

"By the time that Grandfather Morton died about twelve years ago she was completely lost to the family," Helen continued, "and she says she didn't know of his death until five years after, when she came accidentally upon some mention of it in a local paper that she picked up somewhere."

"That was after Uncle Leonard's death, but it seemed to her that she could not make herself known to her people without being disloyal to his memory," Roger carried on the story... Continue reading book >>




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