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Ethel Morton at Chautauqua   By: (1864-1942)

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First Page:

ETHEL MORTON AT CHAUTAUQUA

BY MABELL S. C. SMITH

M. A. DONOHUE & COMPANY CHICAGO NEW YORK

Made in U. S. A.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE I ON THE ROAD 9 II GETTING SETTLED 21 III OPENING OF THE ASSEMBLY 32 IV PERSONALLY CONDUCTED 44 V LEARNING TO SWIM 54 VI ETHEL BROWN A HEROINE 69 VII DOROTHY COOKS 81 VIII THE SPELLING MATCH 91 IX GRANDFATHER ARRANGES HIS TIME 101 X A CHAUTAUQUA SUNDAY 115 XI THE UNITED SERVICE CLUB IS ORGANIZED 127 XII OLD FIRST NIGHT 137 XIII FLYING 150 XIV NIAGARA FALLS 168 XV THE PAGEANT 182 XVI THINK HELP! 199 XVII RECOGNITION WEEK 205 XVIII IN CAMP 216 XIX "MY BRAVE LITTLE GIRL!" 227 XX FOLLOWING A CLUE 238 XXI "WHO ARE WE?" 248

ETHEL MORTON AT CHAUTAUQUA

CHAPTER I

ON THE ROAD

IT was a large and heavily laden family party that left the train at Westfield, New York. There was Grandfather Emerson carrying Grandmother Emerson's hat box and valise; and there was their daughter, Lieutenant Roger Morton's wife, with a tall boy and girl, and a short girl and boy of her own, and a niece, Ethel, all burdened with the bags and bundles necessary for a night's comfort on the cars and a summer's stay at Chautauqua.

"The trunks are checked through, Roger," said Mrs. Morton to her older son, "so you won't have to bother about them here."

"Good enough," replied Roger, who was making his first trip, in entire charge of the party and who was eager that every arrangement should run smoothly. After a consultation with his grandmother who had been to Chautauqua before, he announced,

"The trolley is waiting behind the station. We can get on board at once."

Roger was a merry faced boy of seventeen and his mother smiled at the look of responsibility that gave him an expression like his father. Mrs. Morton sighed a little, too, for although she was accustomed to the long absences required of a naval officer yet she never went upon one of these summer migrations without missing the assistance of the father of the family.

Lieutenant Morton had been with the fleet at Vera Cruz for several months, but although there had been rumors that our ships would be withdrawn and sent north, which might mean a short leave for the Lieutenant, it had not come to pass, and it looked as if he would have to spend the summer under the Mexican sun. His wife drew a little comfort from the fact that his brother, Ethel's father, Captain Richard Morton, was with the land forces under General Funston, so that the two men could see each other occasionally.

"How far do we have to go on the trolley, Mother?" asked Dicky, the six year old, who had already announced his intention of being a motorman when he grew up, and who always chose a front seat where he could watch the operations that made the car go.

"I forget, dear. Ask Grandmother."

"Twelve miles, son, and over a road that is full of history for Helen. Grandfather will tell her all about it. We are turning into it now. Do you see the name on the tree?"

"'Portage Street,'" read Helen.

The party made a brave showing in the car. Helen, who was almost as tall as Roger and who was in the high school, sat on the front seat with Dicky so that he could superintend the motorman's activities. Mrs. Morton and Roger sat behind them, he with his hands full of the long tickets which were to take them all to Chautauqua and home again... Continue reading book >>




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