Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Explorers of the Dawn   By: (1879-1961)

Book cover

First Page:

Transcriber's Notes: The partial phrase "Child, it shall not be done," consoled the appears naturally in the original version on page 191 (Chapter VII, section II), and in a printer's error, is inserted between two halves of a hyphenated word on page 204; the latter was omitted. The use of hyphens in words was made consistent throughout. Variant spelling and dialect was faithfully preserved.

Explorers of the Dawn

NEW BORZOI NOVELS SPRING, 1922

WANDERERS Knut Hamsun

MEN OF AFFAIRS Roland Pertwee

THE FAIR REWARDS Thomas Beer

I WALKED IN ARDEN Jack Crawford

GUEST THE ONE EYED Gunnar Gunnarsson

THE GARDEN PARTY Katherine Mansfield

THE LONGEST JOURNEY E. M. Forster

THE SOUL OF A CHILD Edwin Björkman

CYTHEREA Joseph Hergesheimer

EXPLORERS OF THE DAWN Mazo de la Roche

THE WHITE KAMI Edward Alden Jewell

Explorers of the Dawn

by Mazo de la Roche With a Foreword by Christopher Morley

New York Alfred A Knopf 1922

Published February, 1922 Second Printing, March, 1922 Third Printing, May, 1922

Set up, electrotyped, and printed by the Vail Ballou Co., Binghamton, N. Y. Paper supplied by W. F. Etherington & Co., New York, N. Y. Bound by the Plimpton Press, Norwood, Mass.

MANUFACTURED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

But a short while ago, A. de la R. laughed with me over the adventures of these little fellows. To the memory of that happy laughter I dedicate the book.

M. de la R.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I BURIED TREASURE 15

II THE JILT 52

III EXPLORERS OF THE DAWN 76

IV A MERRY INTERLUDE 99

V FREEDOM 127

VI D'YE KEN JOHN PEEL 160

VII GRANFA 187

VIII NOBLESSE OBLIGE 219

IX THE COBBLER AND HIS WIFE 250

X THE NEW DAY 276

FOREWORD

The publisher has asked me to write a note of introduction to this book. Surely it needs none; but it is a pleasant task to write prefaces for other people's books. When one writes a preface to a book of one's own, one naturally grovels, deprecates, and has no opportunity to call the friendly reader's attention to what the author considers the beauties and significances of the work. How agreeable, then, to be able to do this service for another.

Moreover, one hopes that such a service may not be wholly vain. Every book has its own special audience, for whom very likely unconsciously it was written: the group of people, far spread over the curve of earth, who will find in that particular book just the sort of magic and wisdom that they seek. And, as every one who has studied the book business knows, books very often tragically miss just the public that was waiting for them. It is such an obscure and nebulous problem, getting the book into the hands of the people to whom it will appeal. One knows that there are thousands of readers for whom that book (whatever it may be) will mean keen pleasure. But how is one to find them and bring the volume to their eyes?

I owe to the "Atlantic Monthly" my own introduction to Miss de la Roche's writing. Several years ago, when I was acting as a modest periscope for a publishing house, I read in the "Atlantic" a fanciful little story by her which seemed to me so delicate and humorous in fancy, so refreshing and happy in expression, that I wrote to the author in the hope of some day luring her to offer a book to the house with which I was connected. We had some pleasant correspondence. Time passed: I fell from the placid ramparts of the publishing business, into the more noisy but not less happy bustle of the newspaper world. But still, though I am not a conscientious correspondent, I managed to keep occasionally in touch with Miss de la Roche... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books