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The Falling Flag Evacuation of Richmond, Retreat and Surrender at Appomattox   By:

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Transcriber's Note: Inconsistent hyphenation in the original document has been preserved.

[Illustration: A CAVALRY CHARGE.]

THE

FALLING FLAG.

EVACUATION OF RICHMOND, RETREAT AND SURRENDER AT APPOMATTOX.

BY EDWARD M. BOYKIN, LT. COL. 7th REG'T S.C. CAVALRY.

Third Edition.

NEW YORK: E.J. HALE & SON, PUBLISHERS, MURRAY STREET. 1874.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1874, by E.J. HALE & SON, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.

DEDICATION.

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE

7th South Carolina Cavalry,

THIS

SHORT ACCOUNT OF AN INTERESTING PERIOD IN THEIR MILITARY HISTORY,

AND THAT OF

THE CAUSE THEY LOVED SO WELL, AND FOR WHICH THEY FOUGHT SO FAITHFULLY,

Is Dedicated,

BY ONE WHO CONSIDERS HAVING BEEN THEIR COMRADE THE PROUDEST RECOLLECTION OF HIS LIFE.

PREFACE.

The writer only attempts to give some account of what occurred within his own observation; he would have esteemed it a privilege to enter into all the detail that lights up the last desperate struggle, made by that glorious remnant of the Army of Northern Virginia, with its skeleton battalions from every Southern State; illustrating their own fame and that of their noble leader, mile by mile, on that weary march from Richmond to Appomattox.

But he has confined himself to his own experiences, and in a great measure to what happened to his own Brigade, because it was written out, immediately after the war, from that standpoint. And if there be any merit in it, it is simply as a journal what one man saw, and the impression produced thereby. This, even within a limited range, if truly put, represents at least a phase of the last act in the bloody drama that had been enacting for four years. More than this he could not hope to do, but leaves to abler hands the greater task that swells the current of events into the full tide of history.

CAMDEN, SOUTH CAROLINA, } June 15th, 1874 . }

EVACUATION OF RICHMOND, 1865.

On Saturday, the 1st day of April, 1865, orders reached us at camp headquarters of the Seventh South Carolina Cavalry, Gary's Brigade, to send forward all the dismounted men of the regiment to report to Lt. Col. Barham, Twenty fourth Regiment Virginia Cavalry, in command of dismounted men of the brigade, for duty on the lines. Began to think that a move was intended of some sort, but on the brink, as all knew and felt for some time, of great events, it was difficult to say what was expected. On Sunday, the 2d, about mid day, orders came for the wagon train of the brigade, spare horses, baggage of all sorts, that was to go at all the greater part was to be left to move into Richmond at once, and fall into the general train of the army of the north bank of the James River. Richmond then was to be evacuated, so all felt, though no public statement of the fact had been made; heavy fighting had been going on during the day, in the neighborhood of Petersburg, but there had been one unceasing roar of battle around us for months, and no particular account was taken of that.

The brigade was ordered to move after nightfall from its position (our winter quarters) between the Williamsburg and the "Nine Mile" road, about four miles from Richmond, and immediately behind the outer line of works on the edge of the battle field of the "Seven Pines."

We moved after dark the Seventh South Carolina, Col. Haskell; the Hampton Legion, South Carolina, Lieut. Col. Arnold; the Twenty fourth Virginia, Col. Robbins, and a small party of the Seventh Georgia, part of a company only Gen... Continue reading book >>




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