Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Fletcher of Madeley   By:

Book cover

First Page:

Curtis A. Weyant, Charles Franks, and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.

[Illustration: John Fletcher]

FLETCHER OF MADELEY

BY BRIGADIER MARGARET ALLEN

THE SALVATION ARMY PRINTING WORKS, ST. ALBANS.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

I. AT THE CASTLE II. IN THE MANOR HOUSE III. EARLY ADVENTURES IV. A SWEET GIRLHOOD V. A NEW LIFE VI. GIVEN UP TO THE FIGHT VII. TURNED FROM HOME VIII. THE TERN HALL TUTOR IX. THE VICAR OF MADELEY X. AN ALARMED PARISH XI. THE VICAR'S SERMONS XII. SCANTY ENCOURAGEMENTS XIII. THE ORPHAN HOME XIV. A SEEKER AFTER GOD XV. SANCTIFIED LETTER WRITING XVI. AN UNFORTUNATE PURCHASE XVII. THE COLLEGE OF TREVECCA XVIII. A PEN OF POWER XIX. FAILING HEALTH XX. BY THE SHORES OF LAKE LEMAN XXI. A WONDERFUL WEDDING XXII. LIFE AT MADELEY XXIII. "GOD IS LOVE!" XXIV. EXTRACTS FROM FLETCHER'S LETTERS XXV. EXTRACTS FROM FLETCHER'S WRITINGS

INTRODUCTION.

BY COMMISSIONER RAILTON.

There is a great difference between a red hot man and a Red hot Library book. We have no desire at all to pander to the common idea of our day that "it does not matter what you belong to," by any of these books. Very little reflection will show anyone the immeasurable distance between the sort of clergyman this book describes and the mere leader of formalities holding a similar position in these days of ease and self satisfaction.

John Fletcher was a marvel, if viewed only on his bodily side. At a time when clergymen had far more opportunity than they have even to day to retire into their own houses and do nothing for the world, he pressed forward, in spite of an almost dying body, to work for God daily, in the most devoted manner. That he was able to continue his labours so long was simply by God's wonder working mercy. We cannot judge him because he remained in the strange position (for anyone who cares about God or souls) in which he was found. No other sphere was perhaps possible for him at that time. It must not, however, for that reason be imagined that the Salvationist can conceive of a red hot life mixed with the reading of prayers out of a book, or the teaching of any poor soul to turn to such heathenish folly.

We can gladly take whatever is red hot out of such a life without allowing ourselves to be poisoned in any respect whilst so doing. But it seems necessary, at the very outset, to call attention to this, lest at any time it should be argued that, after all, the Salvationist life is no better, in our opinion, than the stiffest and most formal specimen of Christianity.

About this fervent soul, whose wife was one of the few preaching women of her century, there could have been little voluntary formality, and if he was able to exist amidst the framing that others had set up for him, it may be an encouragement to anyone who is shut out for a time from the free, happy worship that God desires, and left with no alternative but to be content with "Divine services" where God's wishes are too often made of no effect by the arrangement of man.

But what will be the Salvationist's condemnation if, with all the opportunities he has to cultivate the utmost freedom in prayer and service, he never attains to that intimacy with God, that delight in communion with Him, that power to force others into God's presence, which John Fletcher's life discloses to us?

The mere thought of Fletcher, if you read these pages carefully, will ever bring back to you an impression of nearness to God and companionship with Him which is scarcely conceived of in our day amongst the majority of those who ought to lead men to the Father. Do not let us excuse ourselves for any lack of that communion which must be His continual delight. If we prjde ourselves upon our repudiation of forms of worship that men have invented, and glory in the manifestations of Christ at the street corner and in the public house, to which we have become accustomed, let us take care that we do not grieve Him by contentment with the general action of The Army or of the Corps, or of the Brigade, in the absence of any close contact between our own souls and God or the lost... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books