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Food in War Time   By: (1866-1932)

Book cover

First Page:

Transcriber's Note:

In the plain text versions, italics are represented with underscores , and bold text with {braces}.

The following corrections were made to the text: Du Bois to DuBois (p. 45, Index entry) and Oleomargarin to Oleomargarine (p. 46, Index entry).

The variant spelling "calory" (p. 32) has been retained.

FOOD IN WAR TIME

By GRAHAM LUSK

PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY, CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE IN NEW YORK CITY

PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON W. B. SAUNDERS COMPANY 1918

Copyright, 1918 by W. B. SAUNDERS COMPANY

PRINTED IN AMERICA

DEDICATED TO MY FELLOW COUNTRYMEN

CONTENTS

PAGE

I. A BALANCED DIET 7

II. CALORIES IN COMMON LIFE 23

III. RULES OF SAVING AND SAFETY 43

INDEX 45

NOTE

The major parts of this small volume appeared under articles entitled "Food in War Time" in the Scientific Monthly and "Calories in Common Life" in Saunders' Medical Clinics of North America .

FOOD IN WAR TIME

I

A BALANCED DIET

There is no doubt that under the conditions existing before the war the American people lived in a higher degree of comfort than that enjoyed in Europe. Hard times in America have always been better times than the best times in Europe. As a student in Munich in 1890 I remember paying three dollars a month for my room, five cents daily for my breakfast, consisting of coffee and a roll without butter, and thirty five cents for a four course dinner at a fashionable restaurant. This does not sound extravagant, but it represents luxury when compared with the diet of the poorest Italian peasants of southern Italy. Two Italian scientists describe how this class of people live mainly on cornmeal, olive oil, and green stuffs and have done so for generations. There is no milk, cheese, or eggs in their dietary. Meat in the form of fat pork is taken three or four times a year. Cornmeal is taken as "polenta," or is mixed with beans and oil, or is made into corn bread. Cabbage or the leaves of beets are boiled in water and then eaten with oil flavored with garlic or Spanish pepper. One of the families investigated consisted of eight individuals, of whom two were children. The annual income was 424 francs, or $84. Of this, three cents per day per adult was spent for food and the remaining three fifths of a cent was spent for other purposes. Little wonder that such people have migrated to America, but it may strike some as astonishing that a race so nourished should have become the man power in the construction of our railways, our subways, and our great buildings.

Dr. McCollum will tell you that the secret of it all lies in the green leaves. The quality of the protein in corn is poor, but the protein in the leaves supplements that of corn, so that a good result is obtained. Olive oil when taken alone is a poor fat in a nutritive sense, but when taken with green leaves, these furnish that one of the peculiar accessory substances, commonly known as vitamines, which is present most abundantly in butter fat, and gives to butter fat and to the fat in whole milk its dominant nutritive value. The green leaves likewise furnish another accessory substance, also present in milk, a substance which is soluble in water and which is necessary for normal life. Furthermore, the green leaves contain mineral matter in considerable quantity and in about the same proportions as they exist in milk.

Here then is the message of economy in diet, corn the cheapest of all the cereals, a vegetable oil cheaper by far than animal fat, which two materials taken together would bring disaster upon the human race, but if taken with the addition of cabbage or beet tops they become capable of maintaining mankind from generation to generation... Continue reading book >>




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