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From the Easy Chair, series 3   By: (1824-1892)

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First Page:

[Illustration: George William Curtis]

FROM THE

EASY CHAIR

BY

GEORGE WILLIAM CURTIS

THIRD SERIES

[Illustration]

NEW YORK

HARPER AND BROTHERS

MDCCCXCIV

Copyright, 1894, by HARPER & BROTHERS.

All rights reserved.

CONTENTS

PAGE

HAWTHORNE AND BROOK FARM 1 BEECHER IN HIS PULPIT AFTER THE DEATH OF LINCOLN 20 KILLING DEER 28 AUTUMN DAYS 37 FROM COMO TO MILAN DURING THE WAR OF 1848 43 HERBERT SPENCER ON THE YANKEE 56 HONOR 65 JOSEPH WESLEY HARPER 72 REVIEW OF UNION TROOPS, 1865 78 APRIL, 1865 88 WASHINGTON IN 1867 94 RECEPTION TO THE JAPANESE AMBASSADORS AT THE WHITE HOUSE 102 THE MAID AND THE WIT 112 THE DEPARTURE OF THE GREAT EASTERN 120 CHURCH STREET 127 HISTORIC BUILDINGS 140 THE BOSTON MUSIC HALL 151 PUBLIC BENEFACTORS 162 MR. TIBBINS'S NEW YEAR'S CALL 169 THE NEW ENGLAND SABBATH 178 THE REUNION OF ANTISLAVERY VETERANS, 1884 185 REFORM CHARITY 193 BICYCLE RIDING FOR CHILDREN 204 THE DEAD BIRD UPON CYRILLA'S HAT AN ENCOURAGEMENT OF "SLARTER" 210 CHEAPENING HIS NAME 214 CLERGYMEN'S SALARIES 221

HAWTHORNE AND BROOK FARM

In his preface to the Marble Faun , as before in that to The Blithedale Romance , Hawthorne complained that there was no romantic element in American life; or, as he expressed it, "There is as yet no such Faery land so like the real world that, in a suitable remoteness, one cannot tell the difference, but with an atmosphere of strange enchantment, beheld through which the inhabitants have a propriety of their own." This he says in The Blithedale preface, and then adds that, to obviate this difficulty and supply a proper scene for his figures, "the author has ventured to make free with his old and affectionately remembered home at Brook Farm as being certainly the most romantic episode of his own life, essentially a day dream, and yet a fact, and thus offering an available foothold between fiction and reality." Probably a genuine Brook Farmer doubts whether Hawthorne remembered the place and his life there very affectionately, in the usual sense of that word, and although in sending the book to one of them, at least, he said that it was not to be considered a picture of actual life or character. "Do not read it as if it had anything to do with Brook Farm [which essentially it has not], but merely for its own story and characters," yet it is plain that it is a very faithful picture of the kind of impression that the enterprise made upon him.

Strangely enough, Hawthorne is likely to be the chief future authority upon "the romantic episode" of Brook Farm. Those who had it at heart more than he whose faith and hope and energy were all devoted to its development, and many of whom have every ability to make a permanent record, have never done so, and it is already so much of a thing of the past that it will probably never be done... Continue reading book >>




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