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The Girl from Alsace A Romance of the Great War, Originally Published under the Title of Little Comrade   By: (1872-1962)

The Girl from Alsace A Romance of the Great War, Originally Published under the Title of Little Comrade by Burton Egbert Stevenson

First Page:

THE GIRL FROM ALSACE

A Romance of the Great War

Originally Published under the title of LITTLE COMRADE

by

BURTON E. STEVENSON

New York Grosset & Dunlap Publishers

Copyright, 1914. By Burton E. Stevenson

Copyright, 1915. By Henry Holt and Company

Published March, 1915

[Illustration: THERE WAS SOMETHING SINISTER AND THREATENING ABOUT THOSE ROOFLESS BLACKENED WALLS.]

PUBLISHER'S NOTE

The Story of THE GIRL FROM ALSACE

The book was originally published under the title of LITTLE COMRADE. It has been changed to THE GIRL FROM ALSACE, as the publishers considered that name as better descriptive of the character of the story. The dramatic elements of the story led to its being put in play form, and it became the theatrical success entitled ARMS AND THE GIRL, with Fay Bainter and Cyril Scott playing the leading rôles. It has also been produced as a photo play by the World Film Company under the title ON DANGEROUS GROUND, featuring Carlyle Blackwell and Gail Kane, and is being widely shown throughout the country.

CONTENTS

I. THE THIRTY FIRST OF JULY

II. THE FIRST RUMBLINGS

III. "STATE OF WAR"

IV. THE MYSTERY OF THE SATIN SLIPPERS

V. ONE WAY TO ACQUIRE A WIFE

VI. THE SNARE

VII. IN THE TRAP

VIII. PRESTO! CHANGE!

IX. THE FRONTIER

X. FORTUNE FROWNS

XI. THE NIGHT ATTACK

XII. AN ARMY IN ACTION

XIII. THE PASSAGE OF THE MEUSE

XIV. THE LAST DASH

XV. DISASTER

XVI. A TRUST FULFILLED

XVII. "LITTLE COMRADE"

THE GIRL FROM ALSACE

CHAPTER I

THE THIRTY FIRST OF JULY

"Let us have coffee on the terrace," Bloem suggested, and, as his companion nodded, lifted a finger to the waiter and gave the order.

Both were a little sad, for this was their last meal together. Though they had known each other less than a fortnight, they had become fast friends. They had been thrown together by chance at the Surgical congress at Vienna, where Bloem, finding the American's German lame and halting, had constituted himself a sort of interpreter, and Stewart had reciprocated by polishing away some of the roughnesses and Teutonic involutions of Bloem's formal English.

When the congress ended, they had journeyed back together in leisurely fashion through Germany, spending a day in medieval Nuremberg, another in odorous Würzburg, and a third in mountain shadowed Heidelberg, where Bloem had sought out some of his old comrades and initiated his American friend into the mysteries of an evening session in the Hirschgasse. Then they had turned northward to Mayence, and so down the terraced Rhine to Cologne. Here they were to part, Bloem to return to his work at Elberfeld, Stewart for a week or two in Brussels and Paris, and then home to America.

Bloem's train was to leave in an hour, and it was the consciousness of this that kept them silent until their waiter came to tell them that their coffee was served. As they followed him through the hall, a tall man in the uniform of a captain of infantry entered from the street. His eyes brightened as he caught sight of Bloem.

" Ach , Hermann!" he cried.

Bloem, turning, stopped an instant for a burlesque salute, then threw himself into the other's arms. A moment later, he was dragging him forward to introduce him to Stewart.

"My cousin," he cried, "Ritter Bloem, a soldier as you see a great fire eater! Cousin, this is my friend, Dr. Bradford Stewart, whom I had the good fortune to meet at Vienna."

"I am pleased to know you, sir," said the captain, shaking hands and speaking excellent English.

"You must join us," Bloem interposed. "We are just going to have coffee on the terrace. Come," and he caught the other by the arm.

But the captain shook his head.

"No, I cannot come," he said; "really I cannot, much as I should like to do so. Dr. Stewart," he added, a little hesitatingly, "I trust you will not think me discourteous if I take my cousin aside for a moment."

"Certainly not," Stewart assured him.

"I will join you on the terrace," said Bloem, and Stewart, nodding good by to the captain, followed the waiter, who had stood by during this exchange of greetings, and now led the way to a little table at one corner of the broad balcony looking out over the square... Continue reading book >>




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