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The Girl in Her Teens   By:

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THE GIRL IN HER TEENS

BY

MARGARET SLATTERY

The Pilgrim Press

Boston Chicago

Copyright 1920

By A. W. Fell

THE JORDAN AND MORE PRESS

BOSTON

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I THE TEEN PERIOD CHAPTER II THE PHYSICAL SIDE CHAPTER III THE MENTAL SIDE CHAPTER IV THE SPIRITUAL SIDE CHAPTER V THE SOCIAL SIDE CHAPTER VI HER RELATION TO THE SUNDAY SCHOOL CHAPTER VII HER RELATION TO THE CHURCH CHAPTER VIII HER RELATION TO THE BIBLE CHAPTER IX HER RELATION TO THE EVERYDAY CHAPTER X HER TEACHER

CHAPTER I THE TEEN PERIOD

She was a beautiful, well developed girl of thirteen. Her bright, eager face, with its changing expression, was a fascination at all times. It seemed unusually earnest and serious that particular morning as she stood waiting the opportunity to speak to me. She had asked to wait until the others had gone, and her manner as she hesitated even then to speak made me ask, "Are you in trouble, Edith?"

"No, not exactly trouble, I don't know whether we ought to ask you, but all of us girls think, well, we wish we could have a mirror in the locker room. Couldn't we? It's dreadful to go into school without knowing how your hair looks or anything!"

I couldn't help laughing. Her manner was so tragic that the mirror seemed the most important thing in the educational system just then. I said I would see what could be done about it, and felt sure that what "all the girls" wanted could be supplied. She thanked me heartily, and when she entered her own room nodded her head in answer to inquiring glances from the other girls.

As I made a note of the request, I remembered the Edith of a year or more ago. Edith, whose mother found her a great trial; she didn't "care how she looked." It was true. She wore her hat hanging down over her black braids, held on by the elastic band around her neck; she lost hair ribbons continually, and never seemed to miss them. She was a good scholar, wide awake, alert, always ready for the next thing. She loved to recite, and volunteered information generously. In games she was the leader, and on the playground always the unanimous choice for the coveted "it" of the game. She was never in the least self conscious, and, as her mother had said, how she looked never seemed to occur to her.

And now she came asking for a mirror! Her hair ribbons are always present and her hat securely fastened by hat pins of hammered brass. She spends a good deal of time in school "arranging" her hair. Sometimes spelling suffers, sometimes algebra. Before standing to recite, she carefully arranges her belt. Contrary to her previous custom, she rarely volunteers, although her scholarship is very good. If unable to give the correct answer, or when obliged to face the school, she blushes painfully. One day recently, when the class were reading "As You Like It," she sat with a dreamy look upon her sweet face, far, far away from the eighth grade class room; could not find her place when called upon to read, and, although confused and ashamed, lost it again within ten minutes.

What has happened to Edith, the child of a year ago? She has gone. The door has opened. Edith is thirteen. The door opened slowly, and those who knew her best were perhaps least conscious of the changes, so gradual had they been. But a new Edith is here. One by one the chief characteristics of the childhood of the race have been left behind, and the dawn of the new life has brought to her the dim consciousness of universal womanhood. Womanhood means many things, but always three dreaming, longing, loving. All three have come to her, and though unconscious of their meaning, she feels their power. Edith has seen herself, is interested in herself, has become self conscious, and for the next few years self will be the center and every act will be weighed and measured in relation to this new self. Fifty other girls, her friends and companions all just entering their teens, share the same feelings, and manifest development along the same general lines... Continue reading book >>




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