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The Girl's Cabinet of Instructive and Moral Stories   By: (1798-1866)

Book cover

First Page:

THE GIRL'S CABINET OF INSTRUCTIVE AND MORAL STORIES

BY UNCLE PHILIP.

NEW YORK: PHILIP J. COZANS, PUBLISHER, No. 107 NASSAU STREET 1856.

[Illustration: Front Cover]

[Illustration: A Doll's Party.]

A DOLL'S PARTY.

Here is a Doll's party. All the little girls of the vicinity who have Dolls, have assembled in order to give their little favorites a nice party. You see they all have Dolls. They are good girls. They are very obedient. They attend school regularly, and as they are well behaved girls, Santa Claus left each of them a Doll at Christmas time. They have learned their lessons for to morrow, as their mothers have told them, that duty before pleasure is the good girl's motto. They will play sometimes with their Dolls. Will settle on some new Doll dresses, and then bidding each other a kind good night they will return home to sleep. As God is the protector of all good girls, each will say a little prayer to Him before she goes to bed.

[Illustration: The Vain Girl.]

THE VAIN GIRL.

Many years ago there lived in one of the New England States, a fine family, composed of father, mother, and six children. The children were all good, and kind, and industrious, except one. Kate never would do as she was bid. She was in every sense, a disobedient child. She gave her parents much pain and trouble. She was what is called a vain girl. You all know what a vain girl is. A vain girl, is one who attends more to her dress and toilet, than to her books. Kate's father was going to New York some time before Christmas he told the girls, that if they were good, kind and obedient while he was gone, he would bring them each a pretty Album. They all promised to do just as their mother should wish. The father went to New York and returned. The day after his return they reminded him of his promise. He went to his desk and said, "Here they are, but you want me to paint some flowers in them, well Ellen what do you wish?" Ellen said, "a lily Pa, if you please." Julia chose a tulip, and Lizzie a rose. Kate was silent, and her father asked her "Well Kate what shall I paint for you?" She hesitated, but finally said, "I would prefer a portrait of myself." "Very well Kate," said her father, but at the same time a sneer might have been seen on his curled lip. A few evenings after, when there was a large party in the parlor the father gave each of the girls their Albums. Every one was pleased except Kate, who burst into tears, and tossing the book on the floor, left the room. The Album was picked up and there was a portrait of Kate just as she had desired, but beneath it was written, "The flower most admired by Kate."

It was a severe lesson but let all vain girls profit by it.

[Illustration: Lizzie and Fashion.]

LIZZIE AND FASHION.

Lizzie is taking a ride on her pet Fashion. She is not afraid of falling, for she can ride very well. Fashion seems proud to feel such a nice little burden on his back. See how he capers and prances. He knows Lizzie will not fall, and so he amuses himself and her, by jumping about. Lizzie rides every morning and evening. She is delicate, and so her Pa bought her a fine horse. She rides out alone. She is not pretty but she is happy and good natured. When the other girls see her riding they sneer at her and say, "There goes ugly Liz on the pretty horse." The girls are silly and thoughtless. They should reflect that a happy face looks much more agreeable than a handsome one.

As soon as Lizzie has said her prayers in the morning, she goes out on her horse. She rides some miles and then returns to breakfast. As she is delicate, she does not go to school, but studies under her mother. She studies hard, and is very obedient. After dinner she goes out again and rides for two or three hours. It is pleasant to see how Fashion loves her. As soon as she appears at the door he is impatient of restraint, and wishes to rush to her. When she has been riding, and returned, and he is going to the stable, he will turn frequently to see her as she goes along the piazza... Continue reading book >>




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