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The Governess   By: (1864-)

Book cover

First Page:

[Frontispiece: There she stood]

THE GOVERNESS

BY

JULIE M. LIPPMANN

Author of

"MAMMA BY THE DAY," etc.

Illustrated by

CHARLES R. CHICKERING

McClelland, Goodchild & Stewart

Publishers Toronto

1916

Copyright 1897 by

THE PENN PUBLISHING COMPANY

Copyright 1916 by

THE PENN PUBLISHING COMPANY

The Governess

Contents

CHAP.

I NAN II NAN'S VISITOR III MR. TURNER'S PLAN IV THE GOVERNESS V GETTING ACQUAINTED VI WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS VII OPEN CONFESSION VIII NAN'S HEROINE IX HAVING HER OWN WAY X EXPERIENCES XI CHRISTMAS XII SMALL CLOUDS XIII ON THE ICE XIV CHANGES XV A TUG OF WAR XVI THE SLEIGH RIDE XVII CONSEQUENCES XVIII "CHESTER NEWCOMB" XIX IN MISS BLAKE'S ROOM XX THROUGH DEEP WATERS XXI ANOTHER CHRISTMAS

Illustrations

There she stood . . . . . . Frontispiece

"I'll run away first!"

The little governess was beside her

"I have a little errand to do"

"Provoking things!"

The Governess

CHAPTER I

NAN

"Hello, Nan!"

"Heyo, Ruthie!"

"Where are you going?"

"Over to Reid's lot."

"Take me?"

"No, Ruthie, can't."

The little child's lip began to tremble. "I think you're real mean, Nan Cutler," she complained.

Nan shook her head. "Can't help it if you do," she returned, stoutly, and took a step on.

"Nannie," cried the child eagerly, starting after her and clutching her by the skirt, "I didn't mean that! Truly, I didn't. I think you're just as nice as you can be. Do please let me go with you. Won't you?"

Nan compressed her lips. "Now, Ruth, look here," she said after a moment, in which she stood considering, "I'd take you in a minute if I could but the truth is oh, you're too little."

"I ain't too little!"

"Well, then, your mother doesn't like you to be with me, so there!" cried Nan, in a burst of reckless frankness.

Ruth hung her head. She could not deny it but at sight of her companion turning to leave her she again started forward, piping shrilly, "Nannie! Nannie! She won't care this time. Honest, she won't."

Nan stalked on without turning her head.

The hurrying little feet followed on close behind.

"Nannie! Nannie!"

"See here, Ruth," exclaimed the girl, veering suddenly about and speaking with decision. "You can't come, and that's all there is about it. Your mother doesn't like me, and you ought not to disobey her. Now run back home like a good little girl."

The delicate, small face upturned to hers grew hardened and set, but the child did not move.

Nan gave her a friendly shove on the shoulder and turned on her way again. Immediately she heard the tap of hurrying little feet behind, like the echoing sound of her own hasty footsteps. She stopped and swung about abruptly.

"Are you going to be a good little girl and go back this minute?" she demanded sternly, calling to her assistance all the dignity of her fourteen years, and turning on the poor infant a severe, unrelenting eye.

The child gazed up at her reproachfully, but did not reply.

Nan felt herself fast losing patience. "Of all the provoking little witches!" she exclaimed, in an underbreath of irritation.

Ruth's rebuking eyes surveyed her calmly, but she made no response.

"Now be good and trot along back," cajoled Nan, changing her tactics and stroking the child's soft hair caressingly.

There was a visible pursing of the obstinate little lips, but no further sign of acknowledgment.

Nan dropped her voice to a tone of honey sweetness. "See here, Ruthie, if you'll go home this minute I'll give you five cents. You can buy anything you like with it at Sam's, on the way back." She plunged her hand into her pocket and drew forth a bright new nickel, and held it alluringly aloft.

The azure eyes gazed at it appreciatively, but the hand was not outstretched to receive it. For a second Nan reviewed the situation in silence. Then she flung about with a movement of exasperation, and marched on stolidly, and the smaller feet hastened after her, keeping pace with difficulty, and often breaking into a little run that they might not be outstripped... Continue reading book >>




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