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Grace Darling Heroine of the Farne Islands   By: (1834-1909)

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GRACE DARLING

Heroine of the Farne Islands

by

EVA HOPE

[Frontispiece: Grace H. Darling]

London and Felling on Tyne The Walter Scott Publishing Co., Ltd. New York: 3 East 14th Street 1875

THIS VOLUME

IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO

MISS THOMASIN DARLING,

THE BELOVED SISTER OF THE HEROIC GRACE DARLING,

IN RECOGNITION OF HER CHRISTIAN CHARACTER

AND AMIABLE DISPOSITION, BY

THE AUTHOR

CONTENTS

CHAP.

I. Woman's Work II. Ancient Northumbria III. The Childhood of a Heroine IV. Lighthouse Homes V. Lighthouse Guests VI. Christmas at the Longstone Lighthouse VII. A Wedding in the Family VIII. "Prevention Better than Cure" IX. August Pic Nic's Pleasures X. The Perils of the Ocean XI. The Wreck of the "Forfarshire" XII. Grace to the Rescue XIII. After the Event XIV. A Visit to the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland at Alnwick Castle XV. The Darling Family at Home XVI. An Early Death XVII. "Being Dead, yet Speaketh" XVIII. Conclusion

GRACE DARLING,

THE HEROINE OF THE FARNE ISLES.

CHAPTER I.

WOMAN'S WORK.

"The rights of woman, what are they? The right to labour and to pray; The right to succour in distress; The right, when others curse; to bless; The right to lead the soul to God, Along the path the Saviour trod."

What is woman's work? This is one of the vexed questions of to day, and it is one which, doubtless, sometimes troubled the unwilling brains of our forefathers, though to a less extent. They settled it more rapidly and satisfactorily than we are able to do, for, "in the long ago," women were less ambitious than they are now. In our times, they have so forced themselves to the front, that a number of questions have necessarily to be considered; and what woman ought to do, what she can do, and what she must do, are subjects which afford interesting and useful topics of conversation in all circles. As might have been expected, the opinions of even wise men vary with regard to this matter. "A woman is good as a house wife, and a mother," say some. "But as there are not homes enough for them all, something else must be thought of," say others. "A woman has neither strength enough, nor brains enough, for most occupations," say her detractors. "A woman is capable of doing almost anything a man can do, especially those things which are the most honourable and remunerative," say the most enthusiastic advocates of woman's rights. There are some, indeed, who would gladly aid her to mount the very highest pinnacles of fame and social distinction. There are others who are jealous if she succeed in getting her foot, even upon the lowest step of the ladder, and who would be glad, like the Friend of Mrs. Stowe, to give the intruder a push, with the words, "Thou art not wanted here."

In the midst of this clamour of inharmonious voices, it is a little amusing to see how quietly and effectively some women settle the matter for themselves. If, indeed, they are among the best of their sex, they are surely qualified to judge, not only of their own ability, but also as to that which is proper. And they have no difficulty in finding this reply to the puzzling question A WOMAN'S WORK IS THAT WHICH SHE SEES NEEDS DOING. It is her duty to put her hand to any occupation that is waiting for workers. If a fire is raging, and she have strength to bring a bucket of water, and throw over it, is she guilty of an unwomanly action if she obey the impulse of her heart, and work diligently by the side of men whose work it is? If she see "another woman's bairnie" in trouble, is she not right to rush into the streets and snatch him from the danger which threatens him, as the horses come tearing by, and the huge and laden vehicles shake the houses? And is she less a woman, if, seeing these children grown up to manhood, she beholds them exposed to greater dangers than their childhood ever knew, and hastens to their rescue with brave and inspiring words?

To draw the line which separates the right and wrong of other people's actions, is always a difficult, if not an impossible thing, and yet it is what almost everybody attempts... Continue reading book >>




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