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Gunpowder Treason and Plot And Other Stories for Boys   By:

Gunpowder Treason and Plot And Other Stories for Boys by R. B. Townshend

First Page:

GUNPOWDER TREASON AND PLOT.

[Illustration: A MAGNIFICENT RACE. Page 18. ]

GUNPOWDER TREASON AND PLOT

And Other Stories for Boys

BY

HAROLD AVERY, FRED WHISHAW, AND R. B. TOWNSHEND

WITH FOURTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS

London, Edinburgh, and New York

1901

CONTENTS.

WHEN FRIENDS FALL OUT, 9

TWO HEROES, 42

LOST IN THE SOUDAN, 76

THE WOLFMAN, 106

IN HONOUR BOUND, 130

"GUNPOWDER, TREASON, AND PLOT," 145

THE COCK HOUSE CUP, 169

GUNPOWDER TREASON AND PLOT.

WHEN FRIENDS FALL OUT.

Old Dan Mudge, fisherman, of Brixham, Devon, saw a curious sight one afternoon as he walked along the shore between his own village and another of the name of Churston, in order to see whether the gale of the preceding night had disturbed his lobster pots, laid in a symmetrical line just clear of the rocks that lie to the north of Broad Sands, one of the many lovely coves in Tor Bay.

A curiously shaped object floated and bobbed in the still lively sea, fifty yards from shore, and from the midst of the object there seemed to rise yes, he was sure of it a child's cry.

"I must wade in and see to that matter," thought old Dan. "It isn't deep where she's floating now."

"She" consisted, as he plainly saw when he had approached a little nearer, of a most elaborately made floating nest. Two lifebuoys, held apart by thick wire zigzags, floated one above the other; and slung upon the uppermost, hanging between it and the other, was a basket, lined within and without with thickest oilskin. In the basket, lying securely fastened among cushions and blankets, were two splendid little boys, one of whom slept soundly; the other yelled loudly. From their likeness to each other, it was plain that they were brothers.

Old Dan Mudge was astonished beyond words so astonished that he omitted to save the lifebuoys with their ingenious appendage, but simply took the two children out and carried them ashore, leaving their peculiar raft to itself and to the mercy of the waves.

"Good Lord, deliver us all!" he exclaimed. "What a splendid pair of babies! And what in the name of good gracious am I going to do with them?"

As a preliminary to finding an answer to this question, Dan took the children to Brixham, and showed them to his wife and to a select company of neighbours, who had come in to hear the news, having seen Dan walk through the streets with two babies on his two arms.

"You'll have to advertise 'em," suggested some one. But Dan demurred.

"Can't afford that kind of thing," he said.

"Oh, but we must! Hat round for subscriptions," exclaimed some one, "to find the owner of these babes!"

The hat went round, and sufficient was soon collected to pay for several insertions of an advertisement in a London paper of the day; but nothing was ever heard of any claimant to the privilege of proprietorship of the two little waifs, and it was concluded that they were sole survivors of a fine passenger sailing ship bound for Plymouth, which was known to have gone down, with all hands, during a gale in the Channel, about the time of their discovery.

Meanwhile old Dan Mudge was at his wits' end to know what to do with the bairns. His wife was too old and sickly to care to have the charge of small children, though she adored the pair of babes as much as any of the good folk who came to weep over and kiss and admire them during their stay of a few days under her roof.

[Illustration: " Dan Mudge was at his wits' end to know what to do with the bairns. " Page 13.]

The children were of gentle birth, too; that was evident from the quality of their clothes, which were of the finest and best, and carefully marked, those of one child bearing the name "Noel," and the other "Granby." It would not be right, the good old couple thought, even though they were able to do so, to bring up these little ones in the station occupied by themselves, as poor Brixham trawling folk, they being, as any one might plainly see, of gentle birth... Continue reading book >>




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