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Handy Dictionary of Poetical Quotations   By:

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[Illustration: Henry W. Longfellow.]

HANDY DICTIONARY OF POETICAL QUOTATIONS

COMPILED BY GEORGE W. POWERS

AUTHOR OF "IMPORTANT EVENTS," ETC.

NEW YORK THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO. PUBLISHERS

1901 BY T.Y. CROWELL & COMPANY.

PREFACE.

It has been the aim of the compiler of this little book to present a Dictionary of Poetical Quotations which will be a ready reference to many of the most familiar stanzas and lines of the chief poets of the English language, with a few selections from Continental writers; and also some less familiar selections from more modern poets, which may in time become classic, or which at least have a contemporary interest. Readers of English literature are aware that the few great poets of our language have struck perhaps every chord of human sentiment capable of illustration in verse, and even these few have borrowed the ideas, and sometimes almost the exact words, of predecessors or contemporaries.

But often old ideas in a new dress are welcome to readers who might not have been attracted by the old forms; and each generation has its peculiar modes of expression if not its new lines of thought. It is hoped that this mingling of the old and the new will not be without interest. To carry out the plan of making this a "handy" dictionary of quotations and, at the same time, as comprehensive as the space permitted, it has been necessary to confine the illustration of the topics selected to brief extracts from each author. Of course, in all books of quotations the great name of Shakespeare fills the largest space; and the compiler of this book, as well as all students of Shakespeare, is under obligation to the painstaking compilers of the concordances to this poet, and especially to Mr. Bartlett's monumental work. To many other compilers of quotations, especially to the Poetical Quotations Anna L. Ward (published by Messrs. T.Y. Crowell & Co.), the author is under obligations; while he has made an independent examination of the more recent poets, as well as many of the older ones. The topics illustrated number 2138, selected from the writings of 255 authors. The indexes, which will be found full and complete, were prepared by Mrs. Grace E. Powers, who has also rendered valuable assistance in preparing the copy for the press and in reading the proofs.

G.W.P.

DORCHESTER, MASS., July, 1901.

HANDY DICTIONARY OF POETICAL QUOTATIONS.

==A.==

=Abashed.=

Abash'd the devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely. 1 MILTON: Par. Lost, Bk. iv., Line 846.

=Abbots.=

To happy convents bosom'd deep in vines, Where slumber abbots purple as their wines. 2 POPE: Dunciad, Bk. iv., Line 301.

=Abdication.=

I give this heavy weight from off my head, And this unwieldy sceptre from my hand, The pride of kingly sway from out my heart; With mine own tears I wash away my balm, With mine own hands I give away my crown, With mine own tongue deny my sacred state, With mine own breath release all duteous oaths. 3 SHAKS.: Richard II., Act iv., Sc. 1.

=Abdiel.=

So spake the seraph Abdiel, faithful found; Among the faithless, faithful only he. 4 MILTON: Par. Lost, Bk. v., Line 896.

=Ability.=

I profess not talking; only this, Let each man do his best. 5 SHAKS.: 1 Henry IV., Act v., Sc. 2.

=Absence.=

What! keep a week away! Seven days and nights? Eight score eight hours? and lovers' absent hours, More tedious than the dial eight score times? O weary reckoning! 6 SHAKS.: Othello, Act iii., Sc. 1.

Though lost to sight, to memory dear Thou ever wilt remain. 7 GEORGE LINLEY: Song, Though Lost to Sight.

Condemn'd whole years in absence to deplore, And image charms he must behold no more. 8 POPE: Eloisa to A., Line 361.

O last love! O first love! My love with the true heart, To think I have come to this your home, And yet we are apart! 9 JEAN INGELOW: Sailing Beyond Seas.

'Tis said that absence conquers love; But oh believe it not! I've tried, alas! its power to prove, But thou art not forgot... Continue reading book >>




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