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The Head of Kay's   By: (1881-1975)

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First Page:

THE HEAD OF KAY'S

by P. G. Wodehouse

1905

CONTENTS

Chapter

I MAINLY ABOUT FENN

II AN EVENING AT KAY'S

III THE FINAL HOUSE MATCH

IV HARMONY AND DISCORD

V CAMP

VI THE RAID ON THE GUARD TENT

VII A CLUE

VIII A NIGHT ADVENTURE THE DETHRONEMENT OF FENN

IX THE SENSATIONS OF AN EXILE

X FURTHER EXPERIENCES OF AN EXILE

XI THE SENIOR DAYROOM OPENS FIRE

XII KENNEDY INTERVIEWS WALTON

XIII THE FIGHT IN THE DORMITORY

XIV FENN RECEIVES A LETTER

XV DOWN TOWN

XVI WHAT HAPPENED TO FENN

XVII FENN HUNTS FOR HIMSELF

XVIII A VAIN QUEST

XIX THE GUILE OF WREN

XX JIMMY THE PEACEMAKER

XXI IN WHICH AN EPISODE IS CLOSED

XXII KAY'S CHANGES ITS NAME

XXIII THE HOUSE MATCHES

XXIV THE SPORTS

I

MAINLY ABOUT FENN

"When we get licked tomorrow by half a dozen wickets," said Jimmy Silver, tilting his chair until the back touched the wall, "don't say I didn't warn you. If you fellows take down what I say from time to time in note books, as you ought to do, you'll remember that I offered to give anyone odds that Kay's would out us in the final. I always said that a really hot man like Fenn was more good to a side than half a dozen ordinary men. He can do all the bowling and all the batting. All the fielding, too, in the slips."

Tea was just over at Blackburn's, and the bulk of the house had gone across to preparation in the school buildings. The prefects, as was their custom, lingered on to finish the meal at their leisure. These after tea conversations were quite an institution at Blackburn's. The labours of the day were over, and the time for preparation for the morrow had not yet come. It would be time to be thinking of that in another hour. Meanwhile, a little relaxation might be enjoyed. Especially so as this was the last day but two of the summer term, and all necessity for working after tea had ceased with the arrival of the last lap of the examinations.

Silver was head of the house, and captain of its cricket team, which was nearing the end of its last match, the final for the inter house cup, and on paper getting decidedly the worst of it. After riding in triumph over the School House, Bedell's, and Mulholland's, Blackburn's had met its next door neighbour, Kay's, in the final, and, to the surprise of the great majority of the school, was showing up badly. The match was affording one more example of how a team of average merit all through may sometimes fall before a one man side. Blackburn's had the three last men on the list of the first eleven, Silver, Kennedy, and Challis, and at least nine of its representatives had the reputation of being able to knock up a useful twenty or thirty at any time. Kay's, on the other hand, had one man, Fenn. After him the tail started. But Fenn was such an exceptional all round man that, as Silver had said, he was as good as half a dozen of the Blackburn's team, equally formidable whether batting or bowling he headed the school averages at both. He was one of those batsmen who seem to know exactly what sort of ball you are going to bowl before it leaves your hand, and he could hit like another Jessop. As for his bowling, he bowled left hand always a puzzling eccentricity to an undeveloped batsman and could send them down very fast or very slow, as he thought best, and it was hard to see which particular brand he was going to serve up before it was actually in mid air.

But it is not necessary to enlarge on his abilities. The figures against his name in Wisden prove a good deal. The fact that he had steered Kay's through into the last round of the house matches proves still more. It was perfectly obvious to everyone that, if only you could get Fenn out for under ten, Kay's total for that innings would be nearer twenty than forty. They were an appalling side. But then no house bowler had as yet succeeded in getting Fenn out for under ten. In the six innings he had played in the competition up to date, he had made four centuries, an eighty, and a seventy... Continue reading book >>




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