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The History of Pendennis, Volume 2 His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy   By: (1811-1863)

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THE HISTORY OF PENDENNIS.

HIS FORTUNES AND MISFORTUNES, HIS FRIENDS AND HIS GREATEST ENEMY.

BY WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS ON WOOD BY THE AUTHOR,

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOLUME II.

1858

CHAPTER

1. RELATES TO MR. HARRY FOKER's AFFAIRS

2. CARRIES THE READER BOTH TO RICHMOND AND GREENWICH

3. CONTAINS A NOVEL INCIDENT

4. ALSATIA

5. IN WHICH THE COLONEL NARRATES SOME OF HIS ADVENTURES

6. A CHAPTER OF CONVERSATIONS

7. MISS AMORY'S PARTNERS

8. MONSEIGNEUR S'AMUSE

9. A VISIT OF POLITENESS

10. IN SHEPHERD'S INN

11. IN OR NEAR THE TEMPLE GARDEN

12. THE HAPPY VILLAGE AGAIN

13. WHICH HAD VERY NEARLY BEEN THE LAST OF THE STORY

14. A CRITICAL CHAPTER

15. CONVALESCENCE

16. FANNY'S OCCUPATION'S GONE

17. IN WHICH FANNY ENGAGES A NEW MEDICAL MAN

18. FOREIGN GROUND

19. "FAIROAKS TO LET"

20. OLD FRIENDS

21. EXPLANATIONS

22. CONVERSATIONS

23. THE WAY OF THE WORLD

24. WHICH ACCOUNTS PERHAPS FOR CHAPTER XXIII

25. PHILLIS AND CORYDON

26. TEMPTATIONS

27. IN WHICH PEN BEGINS HIS CANVASS

28. IN WHICH PEN BEGINS TO DOUBT ABOUT HIS ELECTION

29. IN WHICH THE MAJOR IS BIDDEN TO STAND AND DELIVER

30. IN WHICH THE MAJOR NEITHER YIELDS HIS MONEY NOR HIS LIFE

31. IN WHICH PENDENNIS COUNTS HIS EGGS

32. FIAT JUSTITIA

33. IN WHICH THE DECKS BEGIN TO CLEAR

34. MR. AND MRS. SAM HUXTER

35. SHOWS HOW ARTHUR HAD BETTER HAVE TAKEN A RETURN TICKET

36. A CHAPTER OF MATCH MAKING

37. EXEUNT OMNES PENDENNIS.

CHAPTER I.

RELATES TO MR. HARRY FOKER'S AFFAIRS.

Since that fatal but delightful night in Grosvenor place, Mr. Harry Foker's heart had been in such a state of agitation as you would hardly have thought so great a philosopher could endure. When we remember what good advice he had given to Pen in former days, how an early wisdom and knowledge of the world had manifested itself in the gifted youth; how a constant course of self indulgence, such as becomes a gentleman of his means and expectations, ought by right to have increased his cynicism, and made him, with every succeeding day of his life, care less and less for every individual in the world, with the single exception of Mr. Harry Foker, one may wonder that he should fall into the mishap to which most of us are subject once or twice in our lives, and disquiet his great mind about a woman. But Foker, though early wise, was still a man. He could no more escape the common lot than Achilles, or Ajax, or Lord Nelson, or Adam our first father, and now, his time being come, young Harry became a victim to Love, the All conqueror.

When he went to the Back Kitchen that night after quitting Arthur Pendennis at his staircase door in Lamb court, the gin twist and deviled turkey had no charms for him, the jokes of his companions fell flatly on his ear; and when Mr. Hodgen, the singer of "The Body Snatcher," had a new chant even more dreadful and humorous than that famous composition, Foker, although he appeared his friend, and said "Bravo Hodgen," as common politeness, and his position as one of the chiefs of the Back Kitchen bound him to do, yet never distinctly heard one word of the song, which under its title of "The Cat in the Cupboard," Hodgen has since rendered so famous. Late and very tired, he slipped into his private apartments at home and sought the downy pillow, but his slumbers were disturbed by the fever of his soul, and the very instant that he woke from his agitated sleep, the image of Miss Amory presented itself to him, and said, "Here I am, I am your princess and beauty, you have discovered me, and shall care for nothing else hereafter."

Heavens, how stale and distasteful his former pursuits and friendships appeared to him! He had not been, up to the present time, much accustomed to the society of females of his own rank in life. When he spoke of such, he called them "modest women." That virtue which, let us hope they possessed, had not hitherto compensated to Mr. Foker for the absence of more lively qualities which most of his own relatives did not enjoy, and which he found in Mesdemoiselles, the ladies of the theater... Continue reading book >>




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