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In the Forest Or, pictures of life and scenery in the woods of Canada   By: (1802-1899)

Book cover

First Page:

IN THE FOREST

or, PICTURES OF LIFE AND SCENERY IN THE WOODS OF CANADA

A TALE BY MRS. TRAILL

WITH 19 ILLUSTRATIONS

1881

[Illustration: A NARROW ESCAPE]

CHAPTER I The Flying Squirrel Its Food Story of a Wolf Indian Village Wild Rice

CHAPTER II Sleighing Sleigh Robes Fur Caps Otter Skins Old Snow Storm Otter Hunting Otter Slides Indian Names Remarks on Wild Animals and their Habits

CHAPTER III PART I Lady Mary reads to Mrs. Frazer the First Part of the History of the Squirrel Family

PART II Which tells how the Gray Squirrels fared while they remained on Pine Island How they behaved to their poor Relations, the Chipmunks And what happens to them in the Forest

PART III How the Squirrels got to the Mill at the Rapids And what happened to the Velvet paw

CHAPTER IV Squirrels The Chipmunks Docility of a Pet One Roguery of a Yankee Pedlar Return of the Musical Chipmunk to his Master's Bosom Sagacity of a Black Squirrel

CHAPTER V Indian Baskets Thread Plants Maple Sugar Tree Indian Ornamental Works Racoons

CHAPTER VI. Canadian Birds Snow Sparrow Robin Redbreast Canadian Flowers American Porcupine

CHAPTER VII. Indian Bag Indian Embroidery Beaver's Tail Beaver Architecture Habits of the Beaver Beaver Tools Beaver Meadows

CHAPTER VIII. Indian Boy and his Pets Tame Beaver at Home Kitten, Wildfire Pet Racoon and the Spaniel Puppies Canadian Flora

CHAPTER IX. Nurse tells Lady Mary about a Little Boy who was eaten by a Bear in the Province of New Brunswick Of a Baby who was carried away but taken alive A Walk in the Garden Humming Birds Canadian Balsams

CHAPTER X. Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, most frequently seen in northern Climates Called Merry Dancers Rose Tints Tintlike Appearance Lady Mary frightened

CHAPTER XI. Strawberries Canadian Wild Fruits Wild Raspberries The Hunter and the Lost Child Cranberries Cranberry Marshes Nuts

CHAPTER XII. Garter snakes Rattle snakes Anecdote of a Little Boy Fisherman and Snake Snake Charmers Spiders Land Tortoise

CHAPTER XIII. Ellen and her Pet Fawns Docility of Fan Jack's Droll Tricks Affectionate Wolf Fall Flowers Departure of Lady Mary The End.

List of Illustrations.

LADY MARY AND THE NOSEGAY A NARROW ESCAPE THE FLYING SQUIRREL ADVENTURE WITH A WOLF INDIAN WIGWAMS THE OTTERS DOLLY'S SLEIGH RIDE LADY MARY READING HER PICTURE BOOK THE GRAY SQUIRREL AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE PET SQUIRREL NIMBLE RECOVERING HIS SISTER WATCHING THE BIRDS THE PRESENT FROM FATHER BEAVERS MAKING A DAM "CAUGHT AT LAST" THE AURORA BOREALIS THE LOST CHILD AND THE BEARS A BOY HERO THE INDIAN HUNTER

IN THE FOREST.

CHAPTER I.

THE FLYING SQUIRREL ITS FOOD STORY OF A WOLF INDIAN VILLAGE WILD RICE.

"Nurse, what is the name of that pretty creature you have in your hand? What bright eyes it has! What a soft tail just like a gray feather! Is it a little beaver?" asked the Governor's little daughter, as her nurse came into the room where her young charge, whom we shall call Lady Mary, was playing with her doll.

Carefully sheltered against her breast, its velvet nose just peeping from beneath her muslin neckerchief, the nurse held a small gray furred animal, of the most delicate form and colour.

"No, my lady," she replied, "this is not a young beaver; a beaver is a much larger animal. A beaver's tail is not covered with fur; it is scaly, broad, and flat; it looks something like black leather, not very unlike that of my seal skin slippers. The Indians eat beavers' tails at their great feasts, and think they make an excellent dish."

"If they are black, and look like leather shoes, I am very sure I should not like to eat them; so, if you please, Mrs. Frazer, do not let me have any beavers' tails cooked for my dinner," said the little lady, in a very decided tone.

"Indeed, my lady," replied her nurse, smiling, "it would not be an easy thing to obtain, if you wished to taste one, for beavers are not brought to our market. It is only the Indians and hunters who know how to trap them, and beavers are not so plentiful as they used to be... Continue reading book >>




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