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Inquiries and Opinions   By: (1852-1929)

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Copyright, 1907, by BRANDER MATTHEWS

Published September, 1907




I Literature in the New Century 1

II The Supreme Leaders 27

III An Apology for Technic 49

IV Old Friends with New Faces 73

V Invention and Imagination 95

VI Poe and the Detective story 111

VII Mark Twain 137

VIII A Note on Maupassant 167

IX The Modern Novel and the Modern Play 179

X The Literary Merit of our Latter day Drama 205

XI Ibsen the Playwright 227

XII The Art of the Stage manager 281


[This paper was read on September 24th, 1904, in the section of Belles lettres of the International Congress of the Arts and Sciences, held at St. Louis.]

There is no disguising the difficulty of any attempt to survey the whole field of literature as it is disclosed before us now at the opening of a new century; and there is no denying the danger of any effort to declare the outlook in the actual present and the prospect in the immediate future. How is it possible to project our vision, to foresee whither the current is bearing us, to anticipate the rocks ahead and the shallows whereon our bark may be beached?

But one reflection is as obvious as it is helpful. The problems of literature are not often merely I literary; and, in so far as literature is an honest attempt to express life, as it always has been at the moments of highest achievement, the problems of literature must have an intimate relation to the problems which confront us insistently in life. If we turn from the disputations of the schools and look out on the world, we may discover forces at work in society which are exerting also a potent influence upon the future of literature.

Now that the century in which we were born and bred is receding swiftly into the past, we can perceive in the perspective more clearly than ever before its larger movements and its main endeavor. We are at last beginning to be able to estimate the heritage it has left us, and to see for ourselves what our portion is, what our possessions are, and what our obligations. While it is for us to make the twentieth century, no doubt, we need to remember that it was the nineteenth century which made us; and we do not know ourselves if we fail to understand the years in which we were molded to the work that lies before us. It is for us to single out the salient characteristics of the nineteenth century. It is for us to seize the significance of the striking advance in scientific method, for example, and of the wide spread acceptance of the scientific attitude. It is for us, again, to recognize the meaning of that extension of the democratic movement, which is the most obvious characteristic of the past sixscore years. It is for us, once more, to weigh the importance of the intensifying of national spirit and of the sharpening of racial pride. And, finally, it is for us to take account also of the growth of what must be called "cosmopolitanism," that breaking down of the hostile barriers keeping one people apart from the others, ignorant of them, and often contemptuous.

Here, then, are four legacies from the nineteenth century to the twentieth: first, the scientific spirit; second, the spread of democracy; third, the assertion of nationality; and, fourth, that stepping across the confines of language and race, for which we have no more accurate name than "cosmopolitanism."


"The scientific spirit," so an acute American critic defined it recently in an essay on Carlyle, who was devoid of it and detested it, "the scientific spirit signifies poise between hypothesis and verification, between statement and proof, between appearance and reality... Continue reading book >>

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