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The Isle Of Pines (1668) and An Essay in Bibliography by Worthington Chauncey Ford   By: (1620-1694)

Book cover

First Page:

THE ISLE OF PINES

By Henry Neville

1668

An Essay in Bibliography

by WORTHINGTON CHAUNCEY FORD

Boston

The Club of Odd Volumes 1920

COPYRIGHT, 1920, BY THE CLUB OF ODD VOLUMES

TO

Charles Lemuel Nichols

lover of books

colleague

FRIEND

ETEXT TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE: Numbers enclosed in square brackets are the page numbers of the 1920 edition. Numbers enclosed in double curly brackets are the page numbers of the original 1668 edition. A damaged and incomplete bibliography and index in several languages has been included only as page images.

The long S in the text files have been changed to the ordinary small S, however the accompanying html file uses the unicode character for the long S as in the original printed document. DW

Contents:

THE ISLE OF PINES

THE DOWSE COPIES

THE EUROPEAN EDITIONS

DUTCH EDITIONS

FRENCH EDITIONS

ITALIAN EDITION

GERMAN EDITIONS

THE S.G. NOT A CAMBRIDGE IMPRINT

THE COMBINED PARTS

THE PUBLISHERS

NOT AN AMERICAN ITEM

THE AUTHOR

THE STORY

INTERPRETATIONS

DEFOE AND THE "ISLE OF PINES"

THE ISLE OF PINES, The combined Parts as issued in 1668

PREFATORY NOTE

My curiosity on the "Isle of Pines" was aroused by the sale of a copy in London and New York in 1917, and was increased by the discovery of two distinct issues in the Dowse Library, in the Massachusetts Historical Society. As my material grew in bulk and the history of this hoax perpetrated in the seventeenth century developed, I thought it of sufficient interest to communicate an outline of the story to the Club of Odd Volumes, of Boston, October 23, 1918. The results of my investigations are more fully given in the present volume. I acknowledge my indebtedness to the essay of Max Hippe, "Eine vor De foesche Englische Robinsonade," published in Eugen K├Âlbing's "Englische Studien" xix. 66. WORTHINGTON CHAUNCEY FORD

Boston, February, 1920

THE ISLE OF PINES

OR,

A late Discovery of a fourth ISLAND in Terra Australis, Incognita.

BEING

A True Relation of certain English persons, Who in the dayes of Queen Elizabeth making a Voyage to the East India, were cast away, and wracked on the Island near to the Coast of Australis, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women, whereof one was a Negro. And now lately Ann Dom. 1667, A Dutch Ship driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity (speaking good English) to amount to ten or twelve thousand persons, as they suppose. The whole Relation follows, written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and declared to the Dutch by His Grandchild.

THE ISLE OF PINES

[3]The scene opens in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the year 1668, where in one of the college buildings a contest between two rival printers had been waged for some years. Marmaduke Johnson, a trained and experienced printer, to whose ability the Indian Bible is largely due, had ceased to be the printer of the corporation, or Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England, but still had a press and, what was better, a fresh outfit of type, sent over by the corporation and entrusted to the keeping of John Eliot, the Apostle. Samuel Green had become a printer, though without previous training, and was at this time printer to the college, a position of vantage against a rival, because it must have carried with it countenance from the authorities in Boston, and public printing then as now constituted an item to a press of some income and some perquisites. By seeking to marry Green's daughter before his English wife had ceased to be, Johnson had created a prejudice, public as well as private, against himself.{1}

1 Mass. Hist Soc. Proceedings, xx. 265.

Each wished to set up a press in Boston itself, but the General Court, probably for police reasons, had ordered that there should be no printing but at Cambridge, and that what was printed there should be approved by any two of four gentlemen appointed by the Court. It thus appeared that each printer possessed a certain superiority over his rival... Continue reading book >>




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