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Journal of a Voyage to Brazil And Residence There During Part of the Years 1821, 1822, 1823   By: (1785-1842)

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First Page:

[Illustration]

[Transcriber's note: The spelling of the original has been retained. This includes a few apparent mis spellings and varied spellings of the same words and names. Diacritical marks not available in this characters set are handled thusly:

[=e] for the letter e with a line over it. [)a] for a letter a with a u shape over it. [)o] for a letter o with a u shape over it. [)u] for a letter u with a u shape over it.]

JOURNAL OF A VOYAGE TO BRAZIL,

AND

RESIDENCE THERE, DURING PART OF THE YEARS 1821, 1822, 1823.

BY MARIA GRAHAM.

ONCE MORE UPON THE WATERS, YET ONCE MORE, AND THE WAVES BOUND BENEATH ME AS A STEED THAT KNOWS HIS RIDER.

[Illustration]

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEN,

PATERNOSTER ROW;

AND J. MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

1824.

LONDON:

Printed by A. & R. Spottiswoode, New Street Square.

PREFACE.

Although the Journal of a voyage to Brazil, and of a residence of many months in that country, was not written without a view to publication at some time; yet many unforeseen circumstances forced the writer to pause before she committed it to press, and to cancel many pages recording both public and private occurrences.

Perhaps there is even yet too much of a personal nature, but what is said is at least honest; and if the writer should suffer personally by candour, the suffering will be cheerfully borne.

As to public events, all that can be new in the Journal is the bringing together facts which have reached Europe one by one, and recording the impression produced on the spot by those occurrences which might be viewed in a very different light elsewhere. Some have, no doubt, been distorted by the interested channels through which they have reached the public; some by the ignorance of the reporters; and most by the party spirit which has viewed either with enthusiasm or malignity the acquisition of freedom in any quarter of the globe.

The writer does not pretend to perfect impartiality, for in some cases impartiality is no virtue; but knowing that no human good can be attained without a mixture of evil, she trusts that a fair picture of both has been given, although it has cost some pain in the writing.

Of the natives of the country, or of those engaged in its service, what is said, whether of those still employed or of those no longer in the empire, was written under the impression of the moment; and the writer's confidence in the good sense and justice of the Brazilian government and people is such, that she leaves the passages as they stood at the moment of writing.

The events of the last three years in Brazil have been so important, that it was thought best not to interrupt the account of them, by continuing what may be called the writer's personal narrative after she reached Chile; therefore the two visits to Brazil are printed together, along with an Introduction containing a sketch of the history of the country previous to the first visit, and a notice of the public events of the year of her absence, to connect it with the second.

The Journal of a visit to Chile will form the subject of a separate volume.

It was thought essential that the narratives concerning Spanish and Portuguese America should be kept quite separate; the countries themselves being as different in climate and productions, as the inhabitants are in manners, society, institutions, and government.

Nothing can be more interesting than the actual situation of the whole of South America. While Europe was engaged in the great revolutionary war, that country was silently advancing towards the point at which longer subjection to a foreign dominion became impossible. Circumstances, not laws, had opened the ports of the South Atlantic and the Pacific. Individuals, not nations, had lent their aid to the patriots of the New World: and more warlike instruments and ammunition had gone silently from the warehouses of the merchant to arm the natives against their foreign tyrants, than had ever issued from the arsenals of the greatest nations... Continue reading book >>




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