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Knots, Splices and Rope Work A Practical Treatise   By: (1871-1954)

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KNOTS, SPLICES AND ROPE WORK

A Practical Treatise

Giving Complete and Simple Directions for Making All the Most Useful and Ornamental Knots in Common Use, with Chapters on Splicing, Pointing, Seizing, Serving, etc. Adapted for the use of Travellers, Campers, Yachtsmen, Boy Scouts, and All Others Having to Use or Handle Ropes for Any Purpose.

by

A. HYATT VERRILL

Editor Popular Science Dept., "American Boy Magazine."

SECOND REVISED EDITION

Illustrated with 156 Original Cuts Showing How Each Knot, Tie or Splice is Formed and Its Appearance When Complete.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I

CORDAGE

Kinds of Rope. Construction of Rope. Strength of Ropes. Weight of Ropes. Material Used in Making Ropes.

CHAPTER II

SIMPLE KNOTS AND BENDS

Parts of Rope. Whipping and Seizing Rope. Loops. Cuckolds' Necks. Clinches. Overhand and Figure eight Knots. Square and Reef Knots. Granny Knots. Open hand and Fishermen's Knots. Ordinary Knots and Weavers' Knots. Garrick Bends and Hawser Hitches. Half hitches.

CHAPTER III

TIES AND HITCHES

Larks' Heads. Slippery and Half hitches. Clove Hitches. Gunners' Knots and Timber Hitches. Twists, Catspaws, and Blackwall Hitches. Chain Hitch. Rolling and Magnus Hitches. Studding sail and Gaff topsail Halyard Bends. Roband and Fisherman's Hitches.

CHAPTER IV

NOOSES, LOOPS, AND MOORING KNOTS

Waterman's Knot. Larks' Heads with Nooses. Cleat and Wharf Ties. Bow line Knots. Loops and Loop Knots.

CHAPTER V

SHORTENINGS, GROMMETS, AND SELVAGEES

Two , Three , and Fivefold Shortenings. Single Plaits and Monkey Chain. Twist Braids and Braiding Leather. Open Chains. Seized and Bow Shortenings. Sheepshanks and Dogshanks. Grommets. Selvagee Straps and Selvagee Boards. Flemish and Artificial Eyes. Throat Seizings. Lashed Splices.

CHAPTER VI

LASHINGS, SEIZINGS, SPLICES, ETC.

Wedding Knots and Rose Lashings. Deadeye and Loop Lashings. Belaying pin Splice. Necklace Ties. Close Bands and End Pointing. Ending Ropes. Short Splices. Long Splices. Eye and Cut Splices.

CHAPTER VII

FANCY KNOTS AND ROPE WORK

Single Crown Knots. Tucked Crowns. Single Wall Knots. Common and French Shroud Knots. Double Crown and Double Wall Knots. Crowning Wall Knots. Double Wall and Crown. Manrope Knots. Topsail halyard Toggles. Matthew Walker and Stopper Knots. Turks' Heads and Turks' Caps. Worming, Parcelling, and Serving. Serving Mallet. Half hitch Work. Four strand and Crown Braids. Rope Buckles and Swivels. Slinging Casks and Barrels. Rope Belting.

INDEX

INTRODUCTION

The history of ropes and knots is so dim and ancient that really little is known of their origin. That earliest man used cordage of some kind and by his ingenuity succeeded in tying the material together, is indisputable, for the most ancient carvings and decorations of prehistoric man show knots in several forms. Doubtless the trailing vines and plants first suggested ropes to human beings; and it is quite probable that these same vines, in their various twistings and twinings, gave man his first idea of knots.

Since the earliest times knots have been everywhere interwoven with human affairs; jugglers have used them in their tricks; they have become almost a part of many occupations and trades, while in song and story they have become the symbol of steadfastness and strength.

Few realize the importance that knots and cordage have played in the world's history, but if it had not been for these simple and every day things, which as a rule are given far too little consideration, the human race could never have developed beyond savages. Indeed, I am not sure but it would be safe to state that the real difference between civilized and savage man consists largely in the knowledge of knots and rope work. No cloth could be woven, no net or seine knitted, no bow strung and no craft sailed on lake or sea without numerous knots and proper lines or ropes; and Columbus himself would have been far more handicapped without knots than without a compass.

History abounds with mention of knots, and in the eighth book of "Odyssey" Ulysses is represented as securing various articles of raiment by a rope fastened in a "knot closed with Circean art"; and as further proof of the prominence the ancients gave to knots the famous Gordian Knot may be mentioned... Continue reading book >>




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