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Legends of the North; The Guidman O' Inglismill and The Fairy Bride   By:

Legends of the North; The Guidman O' Inglismill and The Fairy Bride by Patrick Buchan

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Transcriber's Note: All apparent printer's errors retained.

LEGENDS OF THE NORTH.

THE GUIDMAN O' INGLISMILL, AND THE FAIRY BRIDE.

GLOSSARY AND INTRODUCTIONS, HISTORICAL AND LEGENDARY.

EDINBURGH: EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS. PETERHEAD: DAVID SCOTT. 1873.

PRINTED AT THE "SENTINEL" OFFICE, PETERHEAD, FOR EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS, EDINBURGH.

LONDON, HAMILTON, ADAMS, AND CO. CAMBRIDGE, MACMILLAN AND CO. GLASGOW, JAMES MACLEHOSE. MANCHESTER, WILLIAM HALE. PETERHEAD, DAVID SCOTT.

TO THE VERY REV. DEAN RAMSAY, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.E., THE GENIAL AUTHOR OF REMINISCENCES OF SCOTTISH LIFE AND CHARACTER, THIS LITTLE WORK IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED.

PREFACE.

The Guidman o' Inglismill was written, not to fill up "hours of idleness," but as a relaxation from the cares of a more important and arduous occupation.

Its object is the encouragement of temperate habits, and the enjoyment of "ane's ain fireside."

It is hoped it will be no less acceptable to the reader as another attempt to assist in preserving the pure Doric of "auld langsyne," which is fast being superseded by a language less pithy, less expressive, though more fashionable.

Every "toon's laddie" or he is no true son of the "bruch" however old, however placed as regards wealth or poverty, or wherever he may be on this habitable globe, can sympathise with the lines to the spot "where we were born." There is a charm in the true Buchan dialect to a child of the district, which neither time, age, nor distance can destroy. When "far awa," it falls on the ear like the breathings of some holy melody, and calls up in the imagination a fleeting panoramic picture of early days, and homes, and play mates, swelling the heart and dimming the eyes as they try to gaze down the vista of the past, dotted, it may be, with the resting places of those who have gone "to the land o' the leal."

INTRODUCTION.

The superstition with which the tale is interwoven

"Of fairy elves by moonlight shadows seen, The silver token, and the circled green"

has, for unknown ages, and in all countries, been an article of the popular creed. It is impossible to trace the origin of the belief. Some imagine it has been conveyed to us by the tradition of the LamiƦ, who took away young children to slay them, and that this, mixed up with the tales of Fauns and Gods of the woods, originated the notion of Fairies. Others, that the belief was imported into Europe by the Crusaders from the East, as Fairies somewhat resemble the Oriental Genii. It is certainly true that the Arabs and Persians, whose religion and history abound with similar tales, have assigned the Genii a peculiar country. Again, Homer is supposed to have been among authors the originator of the idea, as, in his third Iliad, he compares the Trojans to cranes when they descend to fight against pigmies or fairies. Pliny, Aristotle, and others give countenance to the belief in a race of fairies; Herodotus described a nation of dwarfs living on the head waters of the Nile; Strabo thought that certain men of Ethiopia were the original dwarfs; while Pomponius Mela placed them far south. But nobody believed these stories, which were taken to be either poetical licences or chapters in romance. It is, however, strange that a race called Obongos, about thirty six inches high, are mentioned as existing near the Ashango country by Paul de Chaillu (the discoverer of the gorilla), in his late work "From the Country of the Dwarfs... Continue reading book >>




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