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Literary Byways   By: (1848-1908)

Literary Byways by William Andrews

First Page:

LITERARY BYWAYS.

Literary Byways

By William Andrews

LONDON: WILLIAM ANDREWS & CO., 5, FARRINGDON AVENUE, E.C. 1898.

Preface.

In the following pages no attempt has been made to add to the many critical works authors bring under the notice of the public. My aim in this collection of leisure hour studies is to afford entertaining reading on some topics which do not generally attract the reader's attention.

It is necessary for me to state that three of the chapters were originally contributed to the columns of the Chambers's Journal , and by courtesy of the Editor are reproduced in this volume.

WILLIAM ANDREWS.

THE HULL PRESS, July 5th, 1898 .

Contents.

PAGE

AUTHORS AT WORK 1

THE EARNINGS OF AUTHORS 43

DECLINED WITH THANKS 67

EPIGRAMS ON AUTHORS 76

POETICAL GRACES 90

POETRY ON PANES 94

ENGLISH FOLK RHYMES 100

THE POETRY OF TOAST LISTS AND MENU CARDS 110

TOASTS AND TOASTING 120

CURIOUS AMERICAN OLD TIME GLEANINGS 131

THE EARLIEST AMERICAN POETESS: ANNE BRADSTREET 143

A PLAYFUL POET: MISS CATHERINE FANSHAWE 149

A POPULAR SONG WRITER: MRS. JOHN HUNTER 160

A POET OF THE POOR: MARY PYPER 167

THE POET OF THE FISHER FOLK: MRS. SUSAN K. PHILLIPS 176

A POET AND NOVELIST OF THE PEOPLE: THOMAS MILLER 186

THE COTTAGE COUNTESS 199

THE COMPILER OF "OLD MOORE'S ALMANAC": HENRY ANDREWS 206

JAMES NAYLER, THE MAD QUAKER, WHO CLAIMED TO BE THE MESSIAH 213

A BIOGRAPHICAL ROMANCE: SWAN'S STRANGE STORY 222

SHORT LETTERS 228

INDEX 237

LITERARY BYWAYS.

Authors at Work.

The interest of the public in those who write for its entertainment naturally extends itself to their habits of life. All such habits, let it be said at once, depend on individual peculiarities. One will write only in the morning, another only at night, a third will be able to force himself into effort only at intervals, and a fourth will, after the manner of Anthony Trollope, be almost altogether independent of times and places. The nearest approach to a rule was that which was formulated by a great writer of the last generation, who said that morning should be employed in the production of what De Quincey called "the literature of knowledge," and the evening in impassioned work, "the literature of power."

But habits, however unreasonable they may be, are ordinarily very powerful with authors. One of the most renowned writers always attired himself in evening dress before sitting down to his desk. The influence of his attire, he said, gave dignity and restraint to his style. Another author, of at least equal celebrity, could only write in dressing gown and slippers. In order that he might make any progress, it was absolutely essential that he should be unconscious of his clothes. Most authors demand quiet and silence as the conditions of useful work. Carlyle padded his room, in order that he might not be annoyed by the clatter of his neighbours. On the other hand, Jean Paul Richter, whose influence is visible throughout nearly the whole of Carlyle's writings, would work serenely in the kitchen with his mother attending to her domestic duties, and the children playing around him... Continue reading book >>




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