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The Logbooks of the Lady Nelson With the journal of her first commander Lieutenant James Grant   By: (1865-1943)

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The Logbooks of the Lady Nelson With the journal of her first commander Lieutenant James Grant, written by Ida Lee, provides a captivating and immersive account of the journeys undertaken by the Lady Nelson during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Lee’s meticulous compilation of logbooks and journals offers readers a unique glimpse into the history of exploration and maritime adventures.

One of the book's most impressive features is the sheer quantity of detail it contains. Lee delves into Lieutenant James Grant's journal, meticulously transcribing his entries as he charts the unexplored waters of Australia's coastline. The level of insight provided through these logs is invaluable, not only for historians but also for those with a keen interest in maritime exploration.

Furthermore, Lee's writing style effectively transports readers back in time, immersing them in the sights, sounds, and perils faced by the Lady Nelson’s crew. The vivid descriptions of the harsh conditions endured by Grant and his team evoke a sense of awe and a deep admiration for their courage and resilience.

Moreover, the book's organization is commendable. Lee arranges the logbook entries in a chronological order, allowing readers to follow the Lady Nelson’s progression over time. This meticulous arrangement enables readers to grasp the challenges faced by the crew as they encounter treacherous coastlines, hostile indigenous communities, and unpredictable weather patterns. The structure of the book makes it easy to navigate and offers readers a comprehensive understanding of the Lady Nelson’s voyages.

Additionally, the inclusion of historical context provides a broader understanding of the period. Lee provides insightful commentary alongside the logbook excerpts, offering readers a glimpse into the social, political, and economic factors that shaped the exploratory missions. This context enriches the reading experience and deepens the connection readers have with the crew and their adventures.

However, some readers may find the book's level of detail overwhelming or overly technical. The inclusion of nautical terms and the sheer volume of transcribed logbook entries may be daunting for those unfamiliar with maritime terminology or looking for a more general overview. Nonetheless, for history enthusiasts and maritime aficionados, this level of detail is invaluable in unraveling the mysteries of the sea.

In conclusion, The Logbooks of the Lady Nelson With the journal of her first commander Lieutenant James Grant is a must-read for anyone interested in Australian maritime history. Ida Lee's careful curation of logbook entries, coupled with her contextual commentary, provides a compelling account of the Lady Nelson’s journeys and sheds light on the challenges faced by early explorers. Despite its technical nature, the book successfully captures the essence of exploration and offers readers a fascinating window into a bygone era of maritime discovery.

First Page:

THE LOGBOOKS OF THE LADY NELSON

WITH THE JOURNAL OF HER FIRST COMMANDER LIEUTENANT JAMES GRANT, R.N.

BY

IDA LEE, F.R.G.S. (MRS. CHARLES BRUCE MARRIOTT.)

AUTHOR OF: THE COMING OF THE BRITISH TO AUSTRALIA, [and] COMMODORE SIR JOHN HAYES, HIS VOYAGE AND LIFE.

WITH SIXTEEN CHARTS AND ILLUSTRATIONS FROM THE ORIGINALS IN THE ADMIRALTY LIBRARY.

GRAFTON & CO. 69 GREAT RUSSELL STREET LONDON. W.C.

First Published in 1915.

TO THE MEMORY OF MY GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM LEE, ONE OF AUSTRALIA'S PIONEERS.

PREFACE.

The objects for which the Lady Nelson's voyages were undertaken render her logbooks of more than ordinary interest. She was essentially an Australian discovery ship and during her successive commissions she was employed exclusively in Australian waters. The number of voyages that she made will perhaps never be accurately known, but her logbooks in existence testify to the important missions that she accomplished. The most notable are those which record early discoveries in Victoria: the exploration of the Queensland coast: the surveys of King Island and the Kent Group: the visits to New Zealand and the founding of settlements at Hobart, Port Dalrymple, and Melville Island. Seldom can the logbooks of a single ship show such a record. Their publication seemed very necessary, for the handwriting on the pages of some of them is so faded that it is already difficult to decipher, and apparently only the story of Grant's voyages and the extracts from Murray's log published by Labilliere in the Early History of Victoria have ever before been published... Continue reading book >>




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