Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Lost Ambassador Or, The Search For The Missing Delora   By: (1866-1946)

Book cover

First Page:

THE LOST AMBASSADOR

OR,

THE SEARCH FOR THE MISSING DELORA

BY

E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM

AUTHOR OF "THE ILLUSTRIOUS PRINCE," "THE MISSIONER," "JEANNE OF THE MARSHES," ETC.

With Illustrations in Color by

HOWARD CHANDLER CHRISTY

BOSTON LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY 1910

CONTENTS

CHAPTER

I. A RENCONTRE

II. A CAFE IN PARIS

III. DELORA

IV. DANGEROUS PLAY

V. SATISFACTION

VI. AN INFORMAL TRIBUNAL

VII. A DOUBLE ASSIGNATION

VIII. LOUIS INSISTS

IX. A TRAVELLING ACQUAINTANCE

X. DELORA DISAPPEARS

XI. THROUGH THE TELEPHONE

XII. FELICIA DELORA

XIII. LOUIS, MAITRE D'HOTEL

XIV. LOUIS EXPLAINS

XV. A DANGEROUS IMPERSONATION

XVI. TWO OF A TRADE

XVII. A VERY SPECIAL DINNER

XVIII. CONTRASTS

XIX. WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS

XX. A TERRIBLE NIGHT

XXI. A CHANGE OF PLANS

XXII. FORMAL CALL

XXIII. FELICIA

XXIV. A TANTALIZING GLIMPSE

XXV. PRIVATE AND DIPLOMATIC

XXVI. NEARLY

XXVII. WAR

XXVIII. CHECK

XXIX. AN UNSATISFACTORY INTERVIEW

XXX. TO NEWCASTLE BY ROAD

XXXI. AN INTERESTING DAY

XXXII. A PROPOSAL

XXXIII. FELICIA HESITATES

XXXIV. AN APPOINTMENT WITH DELORA

XXXV. A NARROW ESCAPE

XXXVI. AN ABORTIVE ATTEMPT

XXXVII. DELORA RETURNS

XXXVIII. AT BAY

XXXIX. THE UNEXPECTED

ILLUSTRATIONS

"If monsieur is ready," he suggested, "perhaps we had better go" Frontispiece

She took up a magazine and turned away with a shrug of the shoulders Page 66

"By Jove, it's Bartot!" I exclaimed " 135

I raised her fingers to my lips, and I smiled into her face " 275

THE LOST AMBASSADOR

CHAPTER I

A RENCONTRE

There was no particular reason why, after having left the Opera House, I should have retraced my steps and taken my place once more amongst the throng of people who stood about in the entresol , exchanging greetings and waiting for their carriages. A backward glance as I had been about to turn into the Place de l'Opera had arrested my somewhat hurried departure. The night was young, and where else was such a sight to be seen? Besides, was it not amongst some such throng as this that the end of my search might come?

I took up my place just inside, close to one of the pillars, and, with an unlit cigarette still in my mouth, watched the flying chausseurs , the medley of vehicles outside, the soft flow of women in their white opera cloaks and jewels, who with their escorts came streaming down the stairs and out of the great building, to enter the waiting carriages and motor cars drawn up in the privileged space within the enclosure, or stretching right down into the Boulevard. I stood there, watching them drive off one by one. I was borne a little nearer to the door by the rush of people, and I was able, in most cases, to hear the directions of the men as they followed their womankind into the waiting vehicles. In nearly every case their destination was one of the famous restaurants. Music begets hunger in most capitals, and the cafes of Paris are never so full as after a great night at the Opera. To night there had been a wonderful performance. The flow of people down the stairs seemed interminable. Young women and old, sleepy looking beauties of the Southern type, whose dark eyes seemed half closed with a languor partly passionate, partly of pride; women of the truer French type, brilliant, smiling, vivacious, mostly pale, seldom good looking, always attractive. A few Germans, a fair sprinkling of Englishwomen, and a larger proportion still of Americans, whose women were the best dressed of the whole company. I was not sorry that I had returned. It was worth watching, this endless stream of varying types.

Towards the end there came out two people who were becoming almost familiar figures to me. The man was one of those whose nationality was not so easily surmised. He was tall and thin, with iron gray hair, complexion so sallow as to be almost yellow, black moustache and imperial, handsome in his way, distinguished, indescribable... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books